LG directs DDA to prepare plan for Yamuna riverbed rejuvenation

first_imgNew Delhi: Lieutenant Governor Anil Baijal on Monday directed the Delhi Development Authority (DDA) to prepare a comprehensive plan for the rejuvenation of the Yamuna riverbed and its floodplains in a sustainable manner.The directions were issued at a review meeting chaired by Baijal. “The LG directed the DDA that work at site should be taken up in a comprehensive manner. The DDA has been instructed to delineate timelines of projects and prepare a bar chart to monitor progress of work,” the LG House said in a statement. Officials have been asked to adhere to timelines and complete the project within two years, it said. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder”The LG further directed the DDA to prepare details of areas transferred to other agencies for temporary usage. These areas should be assessed and taken back by the DDA wherever the required purpose has been fulfilled. “The complete riverfront of the Yamuna should be planned to carry out holistic development. He also stressed that DDA officials should coordinate with all stakeholders to make an inclusive plan,” the statement said. The DDA has been advised to take the help of experts for plantation, landscaping and greening of areas to restore wetlands and the riverine ecosystem, it said. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchings”Basic issues of civic amenities like public access to the river, waiting sheds, pathways, sitting benches and other public convenience should also be addressed in the plan,” the statement said. The DDA presented a plan before Baijal to develop 1,476 ha of land for restoration and rejuvenation of Yamuna floodplains. The DDA has divided this area for development in 10 packages under the project. The areas included in the projects are: Old Railway Bridge to ITO Barrage (Western Bank), Geeta Colony Bridge to ITO Barrage (Western Bank), Railway Bridge to ITO Barrage (Eastern Bank) and NH24 to DND Flyway (Western Bank). The DND to Kalindi By-pass (Western Bank), NH-24 to DND Flyway (Eastern Bank), NH-24 to DND Flyway, Wazirabad Barrage to ISBT Bridge (Eastern Bank), Wazirabad to Old Railway Bridge (Western Bank) and ITO Barrage to NH-24 (Eastern Bank) are also part of the project, the statement said.last_img read more

Cannabis Confusion Poll suggests Canadians anxious ahead of legalization

first_imgIn Alberta, the legal age of consumption is 18 but 41 per cent said they expect the government to fail in attempts to keep pot out of the hands of teens.RELATED ARTICLES:Breaking down a stigma: Expert talks legalization of pot and mental health issuesOpioid users who consume cannabis daily likely to stay in therapy, study suggestsCannabis consumption to be prohibited on U of C campus“[Canadians] are also not feeling as though law enforcement will be fully equipped or have the tools to deal with things like impaired driving an drivers under the influence of cannabis,” Angus Reid’s Shachi Kurl told 660 NEWS.“There’s some skepticism frankly, even on part of police forces, as to whether or not they’ll be using those roadside tests. I think that’s lead to a lack of confidence–not in police, but in the ability of police to be prepared, in the ability to spot drivers under the influence of marijuana.”Certain police forces in places like Delta and Vancouver have said they will not be using the roadside test the federal government is looking at, but the Calgary Police Service has yet to say if it plans to be using that spit test. “Most Canadians worry police in their communities won’t be prepared to spot those driving high,” says the Angus Reid poll. (ANGUS REID GRAPHIC) CALGARY (660 NEWS) – With only a couple weeks to go to legalization, a new poll suggests Canadians still have a lot of questions and concerns about enforcing rules regarding marijuana.The Angus Reid Institute asked around and found while most people–62 per cent–are in favour of legalization, those polled seem to be split on legalization cutting down on organized crime. And 57 per cent of Canadians are concerned that if the drug is legally available for purchase, minors will be able to access it more easily.However, more Canadians are still more concerned about kids accessing alcohol than pot. “More than half of Canadians (55%) say they are more worried about kids engaging in drinking, rather than smoking pot. They are also three times as likely to strongly agree than strongly disagree,” says the Angus Reid poll. (ANGUS REID GRAPHIC) Another concern is where people are going to get their pot. In B.C., there’s only one government dispensary ready to go in time for the Oct. 17 legalization date. Here in Alberta, there seems to be even more questions since there are no government brick-and-mortar stores.“In Ontario, there’s not necessarily going to be government stores up and running right away, so where are people going to get it?” she said. “We don’t know, but perhaps some attitudes will change when we’re into a period of legalization and people can assess how it’s going.”As it stands, you’ll only be able to buy legal government pot through the AGLC’s website.“I think amidst a lot of uncertainty Canadians are feeling a lot of anxiety about [these issues].”last_img read more

Was the Acadian expulsion a genocide New committee to explore that question

first_imgIt is widely accepted that the deportation of more than 10,000 Acadians from the Maritimes in the late 1700s was a crime against humanity, even by contemporary standards.But could this traumatic event in Canada’s early history be considered a genocide?The Acadian Society of New Brunswick, which advocates for more than 250,000 French speakers and Acadians in the province, revived that thorny debate during its annual general meeting on the weekend.The non-profit group has decided to appoint a committee of experts, including historians, sociologists and legal scholars, to determine whether the British-led attempt to rid the region of Acadians between 1755 and 1763 was in fact a genocide.“This is a debate that’s been raging within Acadian circles for years and years,” said Eric Dow, a spokesman for the group. “There hasn’t been a consensus established yet … There’s a lack of closure in the Acadian community.”However, a leading scholar on the subject said evidence to support describing the deportations as a genocide is lacking.“There’s a kind of competition to see whose atrocity is worse,” said John Mack Faragher, a professor emeritus at Yale University in New Haven, Conn. “Contemporary politics are wrapped up in this.”Having established settlements in Nova Scotia as early as 1604, the Acadians largely avoided conflict with the British military until 1755, when Governor Charles Lawrence failed to persuade a delegation of Acadians to swear an oath of allegiance to the Crown.On July 28, 1755, the Council of Nova Scotia issued an order to deport the Acadians from settlements that were home to as many as 20,000 people.Men, women and children were forcibly removed from their homes and their land, which they’d farmed for a century. Their houses were torched and their land given to settlers loyal to the Britain, most of them immigrants from New England.At least 5,000 Acadians died of disease, starvation or in shipwrecks.The majority of those deported ended up in Europe, the New England states and, eventually, Louisiana, where their descendants have been nicknamed Cajuns.Dow said the deportations represent a cornerstone of Acadian history.“It’s part of our foundational narrative as a people. It was an incredibly traumatizing event, the effects of which were felt for at least 100 years after the deportation.”Earlier this month, the federal inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls released a 1,200-page report that found systemic violence against First Nations, Metis and Inuit women constituted a form of genocide and a crisis “centuries in the making.”Asked if the commission’s conclusions had inspired the creation of the Acadian committee, Dow said: “When it comes to these sensitive issues like genocide … each situation has to be considered within its own context.”Faragher said the Acadians were victims of a crime against humanity, as defined by international conventions established after the Second World War.“There’s no doubt that a moral atrocity was committed,” he said in an interview. “It’s a very complicated story. The attempt to try to reduce it to a simple moral binary: was it genocide or not, really misses the point.”To be sure, there were violent incidents and campaigns against the Acadians that could be considered genocidal in nature, he said.“(But) if you want to talk categories, then you need to get precise,” he said. “It’s a murky business.”While there are examples of British officers saying they wanted to kill every Acadian, the overall intention of the highly organized deportation scheme was to move the population elsewhere to make room for immigrants from New England, Faragher said.The expulsions represent ethnic cleansing, not genocide, he said.“The intention of the Acadian removal was not to exterminate,” he said. “Did it have the consequence of killing thousands? Yes. But to bring a charge of genocide … you must be able to show intent.”Faragher said there’s been an long-standing struggle between anglophone historians, who have sought to minimize the expulsion as an act of war, and francophone historians, who have taken offence to what they consider to be a form of ethnic oppression.In his 2005 book, “A Great and Noble Scheme,” Faragher argues the mass deportations were largely organized by the governor of Massachusetts, William Shirley, whose plan was to expand northward.“The instigation, the momentum all came from Boston,” he said, noting that members of the Massachusetts militia helped round up Acadians under the direction of British officers.“It was the Yankees who did the whole thing.”Michael MacDonald, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Harper government sidestepping FNs opposed to pipeline in PR war chief

first_imgBy Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsThe Harper government is “sidestepping” the country’s most potent opposition to the Northern Gateway pipeline by instead targeting a “boogeyman” in hopes of scaring up public support, says a First Nation chief who is part of a coalition that has pledged to stop the project at all cost.Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver have both publicly claimed that American interests opposing the $5.5 billion pipeline project are trying to “hijack” the project in Canada by funding environmental groups in the country.Oliver released an open letter this week claiming these foreign funded environmental and “radical groups” threatened to undermine Canada’s national interest in their quest to stop Enbridge’s proposed 1,172 kilometre pipeline.Oliver said in the letter that Canada faced a “historic choice” of either opening up a new outlet for Alberta bitumen in Asia, or continue to only supply the U.S.The pipeline, which has the  backing of Chinese state-owned energy firm Sinopec Corp., would take bitumen from Alberta to a port in Kitimat, B.C., where it would be loaded onto tankers bound for China and other Asian markets.In his open letter, Oliver referred to the need for the regulatory approval process to “consider different viewpoints including … Aboriginal communities.”Oliver, however, made no mention of the stated position of an alliance of First Nations communities that have vowed to stop the pipeline in the courts or in the forests even if the project gets regulatory approval.The letter was released Monday, a day before a three-person panel, appointed by the environment minister and the National Energy Board, began hearings on the project. The hearings are expected to run over 18 months and the panel will then make a recommendation on whether the project should proceed. The National Energy Board will then make the final decision.First Nations currently form the bedrock of opposition to the pipeline. The majority of the pipeline in B.C. would travel through the traditional territories of these First Nations. Most First Nations in the province have never signed treaties, meaning they’ve never ceded their traditional territories.“They are sidestepping First Nations,” said Nadleh Whut’en First Nation Chief Larry Nooski.Nooski said Oliver is instead focusing on a softer target, namely environmental groups that get funding from the U.S., to drum up public support for the project.“That is why he hasn’t directly gone against the First Nations,” saidNooski, whose community is part of the Yinka Dene Alliance. “He is trying to scare up some boogeyman up there so the general public won’t look to see what is actually going on here.”About 130 First Nations oppose the pipeline and the tanker traffic along B.C.’s coast it would bring. Sixty-six First Nations have signed a declaration opposing the project.The First Nations believe the project poses too high of a risk to the environment, whether as a result of pipeline leaks or oil tanker accidents, to support.“The Haisla people find ourselves facing the ultimate threat to our place in this world; namely the potential destruction of our precious ecological environment,” writes Haisla man Thomas Gregory Robinson, a seasonal fisheries technician, in an affidavit filed Jan. 4 as part of the panel review process for the pipeline. “Long after big oil and its money is gone from our homeland territory…what will be left for our children? The answer is destruction, destitution and death.”First Nations have a much stronger position to battle the pipeline than environmental groups acting alone, said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs.“It’s the Indigenous peoples who have internationally recognized and constitutionally recognized rights to protect the environmental integrity of our territories,” said Phillip. “Wherever there has been a major conflict, it has always been as a consequence of those obligations we have to the land. The indigenous peoples have said very clearly that this project is not going to happen, and it’s not.”Douglas Bland, chair of defence management studies at Queen’s University, said the federal government is avoiding engaging directly against First Nations opposition because they know the project could become a major flashpoint if the pipeline gets approved and the bulldozers start rolling on First Nations territories.“I think they want to keep the environmentalists and the Aboriginal problems in two different sports,” said Bland. “I think the federal government is well aware of the possibility of some sort of blockades and so on, but they don’t want to be put in a position saying out loud that Aboriginal people are a threat to Canada. It would not go over very well.”Oliver’s office would not respond direclty to a question from APTN National News about what the minister’s position was in regards to First Nations which have pledged to block the project, even if it gets the regulatory green light.“Our government will continue to consult with Aboriginal Canadians on the proposed Northern Gateway project, which have been ongoing since 2008,” said a statement from Oliver’s office. “We look forward to continuing our work with Aboriginal communities to strengthen the economic benefits from this important project and listen to the their concerns.”The pipeline issue is expected to come up during the Jan. 24 meeting between First Nations chiefs and the prime minister along with his cabinet, said Nooski.“I will probably be one of many that will raise that issue,” said Nooski, who is planning to attend the Ottawa gathering. “Our issues as First Nations are common throughout B.C. They will always refer to the same things: water and our food supply.”jbarrera@aptn.calast_img read more

Cape Dorset has a brand new school and attendance is higher than

first_imgKent DriscollAPTN NewsIn 2015, the Peter Pitseolak school in Cape Dorset, Nunavut burned to the ground.The cause was arson.Three years later a new school finally opened for Dorset’s older students.kdriscoll@aptn.ca@kentdriscolllast_img

GALLERY Brock talks mental health on Bell Lets Talk Day

‘You are stronger than you think,’ ‘You are not alone’ and ‘Your voice matters’ were some of the positive messages written on conversation bubbles found on Brock’s campus Wednesday in support of mental health and Bell Let’s Talk Day.Several departments within Brock University joined efforts in recognition of the annual awareness event on Wednesday, Jan. 30.Employees and students from Brock Sports, Health Management and Wellness, Student Life and Community Experience and Student Wellness and Accessibility Centre (SWAC) gathered in Thistle Complex handing out resources, giving away free coffee, encouraging passersby to write positive mental health messages and taking photos of people standing behind a giant frame made out of blue and white balloons.A similar photo experience was organized by the Department of Residences in two of their dining halls and a #ConvoPlate workshop organized by Brock University Students’ Union and SWAC took place later in the evening.This past Saturday, Jan. 26, the Brock Badgers men’s hockey team hosted a Bell Let’s Talk game against Lakehead University. The first 100 people to the game received a free Bell Let’s Talk toque and fans wrote positive messages on a large banner in the lobby.More details on the University’s Bell Let’s Talk Day events, as well as mental health resources for students and employees can be found here. read more

Urban Meyer Redshirt philosophy unchanged health key to winning in November

With just one win — or a Michigan State loss — in the way of Ohio State and a ticket to the Big Ten Championship Game, coach Urban Meyer said staying healthy is the key to winning late in the season.Meyer spoke on the Big Ten teleconference Tuesday afternoon and addressed OSU’s goal of clinching a spot in the conference title game, the development of junior offensive lineman Taylor Decker and his unwavering stance on redshirting players. He also talked about the upcoming matchup with Indiana and reiterated praise for one Hoosier offensive weapon.Meyer said he hopes his players understand that “they clinch a spot in the championship game with a win.”Meyer said the Buckeyes had probably their best Sunday practice of the season this week.He said Decker is a “model citizen for a team and program … he’s a much better player too.”Meyer on Decker: “I can’t say enough about how much he’s grown in two years.”Meyer said he “probably should have played” freshman defensive lineman Sam Hubbard earlier this season because “he’s doing really, really good.” Meyer added that it’s too hard to burn a year of eligibility by putting a player on the field this late in the season.Meyer said he still doesn’t intend to redshirt players off the bat. “If you’re not good enough, you won’t play or if you’re hurt, you won’t play,” he said. “If you’re recruiting a good player, play him.”He singled out redshirt-freshman cornerback Eli Apple and redshirt-freshman linebacker Darron Lee as two players who benefited from sitting out a season.Meyer said he doesn’t expect Apple to be at OSU for five years. “My guess is, if he continues to improve, that they move on,” he said.On what the key to winning in November is, Meyer said: “Without question, it’s the health of your team and managing practice.”He singled out freshman linebacker Dante Booker and freshman safety Erick Smith as two young players who are excelling late in the season after developing throughout the year.Meyer said Indiana junior running back Tevin Coleman is “ridiculous.” Coleman ran for 307 yards in a loss to Rutgers last week.He added that Coleman is “definitely an NFL running back.”Meyer said sophomore punter Cameron Johnston had his “worst day this year” against Minnesota last Saturday.He said current Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith had a similar impact at Utah that redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett has had in place of senior Braxton Miller this season.The Buckeyes are scheduled to take on Indiana on Saturday at Ohio Stadium. Kickoff is set for noon. read more

Trump Begins the Morning by Slamming the NFL

The Dallas Cowboys, led by owner Jerry Jones, center, take a knee prior to the national anthem prior to an NFL football game against the Arizona Cardinals, Monday, Sept. 25, 2017, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is up and tweeting, and his target is the NFL. Trump says “ratings for NFL football are way down except before game starts when people tune in to see whether or not our country will be disrespected.”He also says that booing at the Dallas game Monday night when the team dropped to its knees was the “loudest I have ever heard.”Following a weekend of kneeling and protesting across the NFL, the Cowboys and their owner displayed their own version of unity Monday night by kneeling on the field before rising as a group before the playing of the national anthem.Trump noted in this tweets that the team stood for the anthem: “Big progress being made- we all love our country.” read more

Wrestling No 6 Ohio State faces No 21 Illinois and Northwestern in

#1 Myles Martin defeats #3 Nick Reenan of North Carolina State University by decision in the 184-pound bout, 12-5. Credit: Sal Marandino | For The LanternThe No. 2 Ohio State wrestling team (7-1, 3-1 Big Ten) will take on No. 21 Illinois on the road Friday and then will travel to face Northwestern Sunday.Illinois (2-5, 1-4 Big Ten) is in the middle of a four-match losing streak, losing its most recent duel against Nebraska 30-9 on Sunday.Ohio State is coming off a loss of its own, falling to then-No. 5 Michigan 19-7 for the team’s first loss of the season. In the match, the Buckeyes lost 6-of-10 bouts.  Ohio State associate head coach J Jaggers said the team is ready to move on from the loss to the Wolverines.“We took our medicine on Friday and lost a lot of close matches,” Jaggers said. “Hopefully some of those guys that were maybe on the wrong end of close matches find a way this weekend, and get their hand raised.”The Buckeyes might have to end their losing streak without one of their top wrestlers, senior Joey McKenna.The No. 2 wrestler at 141 pounds, McKenna is listed as day-to-day with an undisclosed injury. Assistant coach Tervel Dlagnev said Thursday he will likely miss both matches against Illinois and Northwestern. McKenna is 14-0 this season, with a career record of 93-8.Redshirt sophomore Clay Ragon would wrestle in McKenna’s stead. Ragon is 6-6 in 2018-19 with two wins by technical fall.Ohio State senior Myles Martin, the No. 1 wrestler in the country at 184 pounds, is undefeated on the season, but has a big match against Illinois redshirt senior Emery Parker, who, at No. 4, is 11-1 this season.Parker defeated Martin in the 2016-2017 NCAA championships by a 14-9 decision. Earlier that season, Martin defeated Parker by major decision 11-3.Ohio State volunteer coach Bo Jordan said he is not concerned about Martin’s upcoming bout.“He looks pretty incredible right now, so as far as him being tested or not, I’m not sure,” Jordan said. “If he wrestles the way he can, I honestly don’t see many people that can beat him.”Northwestern (3-6, 1-3 Big Ten) is also on a losing streak, losing its past two meets, including its last duel against No. 3 Iowa 33-7.Dlagnev said Ohio State has more than just winning on its mind heading into its two matches this weekend.“I’m just hoping to see progress every week,” Dlagnev said. “We talk about every match is an opportunity.” Ohio State redshirt junior Ke-Shawn Hayes, the No. 7 wrestler in the country at 157 pounds with a 14-4 record, has a tough bout against Northwestern third-ranked redshirt sophomore Ryan Deakin, who has a 19-2 record.Jordan is looking forward to seeing how Hayes does against a pair of ranked opponents this weekend.“Just excited for him he has two opportunities to go out there and wrestle the way he wants to wrestle to see where he is at,” Jordan said. “I think he will be just fine. He can win both of those matches.”Ohio State true freshman Malik Heinselman squares of against Northwestern redshirt sophomore Sebastian Rivera, the No. 1 wrestler in the country at 125 pounds, who is undefeated on the season in 18 matches.Dlagnev said this matchup for the true freshman provides an opportunity to gain experience on the mat.“We want to see the confident Malik that wrestles in practice out there,” Dlagnev said. “We see some awesome wrestling from him in [practice], and if he can just unleash that, that is what we are going for.” Ohio State will face No. 21 Illinois at 9 p.m. on Friday in Champaign, Illinois, and then heads to Evanston, Illinois to duel Northwestern at 1 p.m. Sunday. read more

EHF Champions League 20102011 RNL and Medvedi open Quarterfinalist list

EHF Champions League First two teams in EHF Champions League Quarter Finals are Rhein Neckar Lowen and Chekhovskie Medvedi.Chekhovskie Medvedi (RUS) – Bosna Sarajevo (BIH) 30:17 (11:9)With their second clear victory against Bosna Sarajevo the Bears had no problems qualifying to be amongst the eight top teams – and will find themselves in Pot 1 on Monday when the next round draw is staged in Vienna.It took 30 minutes but then the Bears from Chekhov started stepped up into express mode. After the clear 31:22 away victory in Sarajevo the Russians needed one half to find their rhythm in the return match.Surprisingly Bosna were in lead until the 15th (5:4) after a starting period weak in goals. But after some loud words from coach Vladimir Maximov during a time-out in the 22nd minute Chekhov improved and equalized for the first time taking the score to 7:7.Thanks to three straight goals and an improved defence, Chekhov took over the control.At the break (11:9) Bosna were still in with a shout of a good result, but with additional six straight Russian goals at 12:10 the match was decided. Bosna resigned and in the 51st minute the gap was ten goals for the first time at 24:14, in a match with a lot of suspensions and penalties.Scoring only eight goals after the break the Bosnians did not have any chance of standing the physical power and speed of the Russians Bears, who were able to count once again on the saves of goalkeeper, Oleg Grams.Rhein Neckar Löwen (GER) – RK Croatia Ossiguranje Zagreb (CRO) 27:27 (11:9)The 31:28 victory in Zagreb was worth its weight in gold for the Löwen: The return match on home ground was a thrilling game for the Germans but in the end they qualified for the VELUX EHF Champions League Quarterfinals for the second time.Just as in 2010 (by Barcelona) Zagreb were eliminated in the Last 16 – and just as in 2008 they tied 27:27, this time against the Löwen.Both teams played close to perfection in defence in the first half – so only four field goals were scored in total after 15 minutes.Apart from both goalkeepers, Slawomir Szmal (Löwen) and Marin Sego (Zagreb) played well.But Löwen lacked ideas and movement in attack. Also Zagreb had to wait long for the inspiration of Ivano Balic as their top star suffered from a knee injury and did not have so much playing time before the break.In the first 30 minutes Löwen were in the lead most of the time – but could not increase the gap intermediately due to the number of errors in attack.Every time it counted they could rely on Olafur Stefansson who scored the crucial goals. His third goal took the score to10:7 – the first three goal difference – the fourth, the starter after the break.Balic returning to the court more often – cheered loudly by the huge number of Croatian spectators in Mannheim – Zagreb improved, though not just because of Balic’s goals and they equalized at 12:12 in the 35th minute.In this period only Grzegorz Tkaczyk kept the Löwen in the game, scoring three goals in four minutes.But the Croats kept up with the Germans and with two outstanding goalkeepers and some “magic goals” from top scorer Uwe Gensheimer (in total nine).With ten minutes to go Zagreb had leveled the score again at 19:19 – and still had a chance of a place in the Quarterfinals. It was Tkaczyk, who was to blow out the candle of hopes with three more goals at 23:21 – in addition Löwen led with four goals.On the other side Löwen could not stop David Spiler, Zagreb’s best scorer with nine goals, who broke through the German defence very easily.It was Ivano Balic who brought the first lead to the Croats exactly four minutes before the end at the 24:23.Three more goals were missing for the sensation but goals by Stefansson and Gensheimer turned the match again at 25:24 in a highly tense final stage.Even though Zagreb leveled at the end, the decision was taken earlier, as it was obvious that the three goal gap was a too big a burden for the Croats.Statements after the match:Ivica Obrvan, coach Zagreb: “The draw is a success for us, as we had to replace four injured players – and Balic and Valcic could not play at 100 percent. It was a great pleasure to play in this arena. I think Löwen are a candidate for the FINAL4 and even could even win the Champions League this season.”Marko Kopljar, player Zagreb: “We missed the Quarterfinals in the first match in Zagreb, not today. Our defence and goalkeeping were much better than on Sunday, but as Löwen have much more alternatives on the bench they qualified for the next stage.”Gudmundur Gudmundsson, coach Löwen: “It was a huge piece of work against a very strong opponent. It was obvious before that this would be a tough match. Before the break our defence and goalkeeper were good and the attack was weak, and after the break the attack improved in the same time as the defence became weaker. I am very satisfied that we have reached the Quarterfinals which means a big success for our club after tough Group Matches and Last 16 games.”Ivan Cupic, player Löwen: “Like I said in Zagreb, today was the second half of a match. After winning the first and having a tie in the second we are through now. Zagreb were clearly better compared to the first leg, but in the crucial stage Gensheimer and Tkaczyk scored the decisive goals. It was unfortunate that our final attacks did not end with a goal, because I would have liked to win this game.”TEXT: Björn Pazen (EHFCL.COM) ← Previous Story Oltchim no longer Ramnicu Valcea sponsor Next Story → Vietnam to watch EHF Champions League read more

Wenger explains why United lost

first_imgThe former Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger believes Paris Saint-Germain was able to overpower Manchester United in the midfield.Goals by Presnel Kimpembe and Kylian Mbappe gave French Ligue 1 leaders Paris Saint-Germain a 2-0 victory over English Premier League side Manchester United.The game was part of the UEFA Champions League Round of 16 first leg match and was played at Old Trafford.And to try to explain why the Red Devils lost is difficult.Unless you are former Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger, who gave an explanation on what happened.“In the Champions League it is an important thing that you cannot be dominated in midfield and the whole evening Man United were dominated in midfield,” he was quoted by Metro in the United Kingdom.“Paris Saint-Germain played with five midfielders and they never lost the ball.”“Manchester United could never win the ball back and when they had the ball they lost it very quickly because Paris Saint-Germain dominated the midfield to win the ball back,” he added.“And they lost the battle there, in midfield. When you play at home and you cannot keep the ball, you’re always in trouble and that’s what happened.”Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“Man United looked very poor in midfield compared to the class of PSG,” he said.“And basically it was a little advantage for Paris Saint-Germain to play with five midfielders tonight and with less offensive players.”“The difference technically, and speed of understanding of the game, between the two teams, was huge and became bigger as the game went on,” he continued.“Man United played at home and had one shot on goal in a Champions League game – that tells you about the difference between the two teams.”The second leg will be played on March 6th in Paris, France. The winner will advance to the Quarterfinals.Full-time at Old Trafford. #MUFC #UCL pic.twitter.com/gv8Ai6ICXw— Manchester United (@ManUtd) February 12, 2019last_img read more

State stalls on tracking cannabis products

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – When California voters legalized recreational marijuana, they were told there would be a system to track and trace every legal marijuana product.That was back in 2016, but three years later, state regulators still have not put that system into place.The system that some call “seed to sale” is supposed to help account for taxable products while protecting consumer safety.Greg Magdoff, who owns PharmLabs, a cannabis testing lab in the Morena District said he doesn’t understand why the State has been so slow to implement the tracking system.He said first identifying the plant as a seedling, then following it through testing and all the way through the distribution chain guarantees that the product has been tested before it’s sold to the consumer.Lincoln Fish, the CEO of Outco, a cannabis company near El Cajon said without a tracking system, the State is losing tax revenue.“Everyone’s saying, why are we not getting the tax revenue we expected? Well, part of it is because we have a lot of material flowing in from the black market and into the legal market as well,” Fish said.He said crooked operators can also use a number from one batch that has undergone testing and try to attach the same number to hundreds of products that haven’t been tested at all.In that way, untracked products can find an easier path into the black market. Magdoff said the absence of a tracking protocol allows the black market to continue.“I think it does allow unscrupulous people to take advantage of the system,” Magdoff said.In recent weeks, the State of California appears to be inching closer to implementing the “seed to sale” system.Temporary licenses that were issued last year are expiring in June and regulators have reportedly stipulated that anyone applying for a permanent cannabis business license will have to be using the track and trace system. Posted: April 26, 2019 April 26, 2019 Sasha Foo, Sasha Foo State stalls on tracking cannabis products Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

US adds robust 263K jobs unemployment at 49year low 36

first_img AP, Categories: Local San Diego News, National & International News FacebookTwitter AP US adds robust 263K jobs; unemployment at 49-year low: 3.6% WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added a robust 263,000 jobs in April, suggesting that businesses have shrugged off earlier concerns that the economy might slow this year and anticipate strong customer demand.The unemployment rate fell to a five-decade low of 3.6% from 3.8%, though that drop partly reflected an increase in the number of Americans who stopped looking for work. Average hourly pay rose 3.2% from 12 months earlier, a healthy increase though unchanged from the previous month.Friday’s jobs report from the Labor Department showed that solid economic growth is still encouraging strong hiring nearly a decade into the economy’s recovery from the Great Recession. The economic expansion is set to become the longest in history in July.Many businesses say they’re struggling to find workers. Some have taken a range of steps to fill jobs, including training more entry-level workers, loosening educational requirements and raising pay.The brightening picture represents a sharp improvement from the start of the year. At the time, the government was enduring a partial shutdown, the stock market had plunged, trade tensions between the United States and China were flaring and the Federal Reserve had just raised short-term interest rates in December for a fourth time in 2018. Analysts worried that the economy might barely expand in the first three months of the year.Yet the outlook soon brightened. Chair Jerome Powell signaled that the Fed would put rate hikes on hold. Trade negotiations between the U.S. and China made some progress. The economic outlook in some other major economies improved. Share prices rebounded.And in the end, the government reported that the U.S. economy grew at a 3.2% annual rate in the January-March period — the strongest pace for a first quarter since 2015. That said, the growth was led mostly by factors that could prove temporary — a restocking of inventories in warehouses and on store shelves and a narrowing of the U.S. trade deficit. By contrast, consumer spending and business investment, which more closely reflect the economy’s underlying strength, were relatively weak.Yet American households have become more confident since the winter and are ramping up spending. Consumer spending surged in March by the most in nearly a decade. A likely factor is that steady job growth and solid wage increases have enlarged Americans’ paychecks.Businesses are also spending more freely. Orders to U.S. factories for long-lasting capital goods jumped in March by the most in eight months. That suggested that companies were buying more computers, machinery and other equipment to keep up with growing customer demand.Housing, too, is rebounding after home sales had slumped in the second half of last year. Mortgage rates rose to nearly 5% last fall as the Fed raised interest rates. With the Fed now putting rate hikes on hold, borrowing costs have declined.In February, sales of existing homes jumped by the most in three years. And in March, more Americans signed contracts to buy a house. Contract signings usually lead to finished sales one to two months later. Posted: May 3, 2019 May 3, 2019last_img read more

Miami Seaquarium hosts annual Bunnypalooza celebration

first_imgVIRGINIA KEY, FLA. (WSVN) – The Miami Seaquarium is hosting its annual Bunnypalooza this weekend.The family-friendly event, which opened Friday, will run until Sunday.The three-day event is filled with parades, egg hunts and the Easter bunny.Carmen Arce, a Miami Seaquarium spokesperson, said, “As you can see, we have a lot of activities going on in the background. We have rides. We have the fun slides, the continuous egg hunts that you cannot miss. It’s something that the whole family can do.”Miami Seaquarium officials said parents and kids can also enjoy a new exhibit this year.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Apple News Plus is a 999permonth ondemand service for news junkies

first_imgScreenshot by Queenie Wong/CNET Apple on Monday unveiled Apple News Plus, a $9.99 per month subscription service that lets you access articles from different publications including more than 300 magazines. The service traces its roots back to Texture, a digital magazine distributor that was billed as a sort of Netflix for magazines. It gave users unlimited access to different magazines for a single fee. Now playing: Watch this: Aug 30 • iPhone 11, 11 Pro, 11R and 11 Max: Price, specs and features we expect on Sept. 10 3:58 Tags The pricing is the same as for Texture, which originally charged $9.99 a month, and includes family sharing at no extra charge. Up to six family members can share an Apple News Plus subscription. The service, which launches Monday, is available in the US and Canada in English and French. It will launch in Australia and the UK in autumn.Apple News Plus is part of an array of service unveiled by Apple, as Apple shifts its business so it’s less dependent on hardware like its iPhones or iPads. The company, for instance, still generates two-thirds of its revenue from the iPhone alone, although it faces a maturing and increasingly competitive market for smartphones. The design of the app includes live covers of magazines where the image moves. See All 9 Sprint Now playing: Watch this: $999 Mobile Tech Industry Digital Media Apple Event Comments See It • See It $999 Originally published March 25, 10:13 a.m. PSTUpdate, 10:32 a.m. PST: Adds more detail.Update, 10:37 a.m. PST: Adds details about live magazine covers. Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR Apple announces Apple News Pluscenter_img Apple Event Best Buy $999 Apple How to get started with Apple News Plus 2:00 See It reading • Apple News Plus is a $9.99-per-month on-demand service for news junkies $999 Aug 29 • New iPhones, Apple Watch and more: Apple’s September event preview Aug 26 • Every Apple TV Plus show announced so far Apple said it doesn’t know what its news service users read and won’t allow advertisers to track readers. Apple News Plus also includes articles from newspapers such as the Los Angeles Times and The Wall Street Journal. Vogue, National Geographic, Esquire, The New Yorker and other magazines are also available to Apple News Plus subscribers. Apple is offering subscribers to the news service a free one-month trial. Monday’s announcement is an upgrade of the original Apple News app, which originally launched at WWDC in 2015.”We are committed to quality journalism from trusted sources and allowing magazines to keep producing beautifully designed and engaging stories for users,” Eddy Cue, Apple’s head of internet software and services, said in a statement when Apple bought Texture last year. In the run-up to the announcement, there was some concern from publishers on how the revenue from the service would be divided up, the Wall Street Journal reported in February. On Thursday, New York Times CEO Mark Thompson told Reuters that the media organization will likely not be involved. “We tend to be quite leery about the idea of almost habituating people to find our journalism somewhere else,” he told Reuters.  Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Aug 30 • Apple will launch iPhone 11 on Sept. 10 in Cupertino Share your voice Boost Mobile CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Watch Apple News Plus, and its live magazine covers, in action. https://t.co/3pcxJUPI4z #AppleEvent pic.twitter.com/eVKcDNFPQx— CNET (@CNET) March 25, 2019 See it Apple iPhone XSlast_img read more

Astronauts Play Cosmic Tennis Match to Kick off US Open

first_img Hubble Space Telescope Captures Star’s Eerie Gaseous GlowElon Musk’s Cheeky ‘Nuke Mars!’ Post Is Taking Over Twitter Stay on target Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.center_img Astronauts are faced with many challenges in space—perhaps none as difficult, though, as playing a zero-gravity doubles tennis match.To mark the start of the U.S. Open, NASA’s Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold faced Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Alexander Gerst (of the European Space Agency) in a gravity-defying game aboard the ISS.Projection-mapped onto Queens’ famed Unisphere, the hour-long event was streamed live on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter.“The fact that we don’t have gravity is hard,” Feustel said in a recent statement. “Balls won’t bounce, and gravity has no effect.“To me, it’s going to seem like that old game Pong, where you hit the ball and the ball just goes straight; it doesn’t bounce on anything,” he explained. “So it’s going to be challenging. We might have to invent some new rules.”An American geophysicist and astronaut, Feustel was selected by NASA in 2000, and after two spaceflights in 2009 and 2011, he returned to the cosmos in March as Commander of the International Space Station.He is also an avid tennis player and fan—and the perfect mascot for the United States Tennis Association’s Net Generation program, which promotes tennis for kids.“Drew’s passion for tennis and space travel is inspiring our youth to serve to the Moon and seek the unknown while also demonstrating the benefits of a fit and athletic lifestyle,” USTA Chief Marketing Officer Amy Coyne said.The agency supplied ISS members with mini rackets and balls for their sporting event.“We practiced for weeks and weeks for this match,” Feustel said in a post-game interview. “I feel good. I feel a little bit winded. It was a difficult match” playing in microgravity.The Earth-bound 138th US Open—held from Aug. 27 to Sept. 9 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York City—is the fourth and final Grand Slam event of 2018.Feustel made headlines earlier this year when he forgot a crucial piece of equipment during a spacewalk. Less embarrassingly, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev recently took folks on a virtual tour of the ISS’s longest route. Keep up to date with the International Space Station here.last_img read more

Do you have any dating site profiles your partner doesnt know about

first_imgGAYSTARNEWS- _asc, _auc, address_bar_tracking, trackedUrl _asc, _auc, _smb_api_session, address_bar_tracking, atrk.gif, ckid, cktst, gs_chn_id, gs_trk_id, gs_user_id, gsHideBar, LSW_WEB, ps/analytics, trackedUrl ckid, cktst, ps/analytics Unclassified cookies are cookies that we are in the process of classifying, together with the providers of individual cookies. _smb_api_session, _smb_api_session, gs_trk_id, gs_user_id, LSW_WEB Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Let Hawaii Happen – A Surprise LGBT Wedding videoLGBT tourism: 10th edition of GNETWORK 360Istanbul LGBT Pride Parade and tourism: A violent NO by Dictator ErdoganRead the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/poll-dating-app-partner/last_img read more

Trends and Advances in Cardiac Ultrasound at ASE 2016

first_imgVideos | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 28, 2016 Trends and Advances in Cardiac Ultrasound at ASE 2016 FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 14:53Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -14:53 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Find more SCCT news and videos Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Conference Coverage View all 396 items Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Interview with MD Buyline clinical analysts Jon Brubaker and Sabrina Newell at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2016 annual meeting. They highlighted trends they have seen in cardiac  strain imaging, 3-D echo, bubble contrast, interventional echo, structural heart, and point-of-care ultrasound. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting. center_img Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items Women’s Health View all 62 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Recent Videos View all 606 items Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Costa Rican diet The No Sugar challenge

first_imgThanks for reading The Tico Times. We strive to keep you up to date about everything that’s been happening in Costa Rica. We work hard to keep our reporting independent and groundbreaking, but we need your help. The Tico Times is partly funded by you and every little bit helps. If all our readers chipped in a buck a month we’d be set for years. Support the Tico Times Facebook Comments Due to its location, Costa Rica is a cultural and biological bridge between North and South America, which makes it the perfect spot for diversity.Indigenous peoples consumed corn, beans, pineapple, cacao and avocados. They fished and ate the meat of turtles, manatees, deer, tapirs and others. When the region was colonized, Europeans introduced wheat and ingredients from other parts of the world, such as rice from China and spices from India.Over the years and, of course, with globalization, Costa Rica’s cuisine has been influenced by global trends. However, food is still one of the biggest manifestations of culture, and some ingredients and dishes have become part of enduring traditions. As an example, in Nicoya — a so-called “blue zone” with above-average life expectancy — people still rely on corn as a principal ingredient, and they prepare dishes such as tortillas, atol, and even drinks like pozol.Procurement, storage, preparation and consumption are the four basic elements comprising the food tradition, and they are developed in a specific context of practices and knowledge. That context is constantly changing, and even more so nowadays. Each region in Costa Rica has its own food tradition, shown here at Costa Rica’s Cuisine Exhibition. María José Braddick Serrano / The Tico TimesEven though corn, rice and beans, and other foods are still very much part of the Costa Rican diet, other easy-to-prepare or procure options have earned a spot on Ticos’ tables too. When combined with physical inactivity, diets full of processed food can affect your general health and can put you at risk of heart diseases, according to the Costa Rican Social Security Fund. One of their recommendations is to avoid added sugars and to consume instead only natural sugars.Added or hidden sugars are typically found in pastries, cakes, sugary treats and soda drinks, and they are empty calories — meaning that, unlike nutrient- and fiber-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables, they add little or no nutritional value. Even honey and maple syrup, when added to a food that would not otherwise contain them, constitute an “added sugar.” Options labeled as “healthy” or “light” can contain added sugars too; for example: cereals, energy bars, fruit juices, peanut butter, smoothies and granola.It can be difficult to identify all sources of sugar in a food, as it appears in dozens of different ways on labels (fructose, glucose, sucrose, molasses, invert sugar, corn syrup, etc).For those looking for additional help, social media can come in handy. Miguel Gatica runs a popular account dedicated to promoting a sugar-free lifestyle, and we met to learn more about his mission. Miguel Gatica, creator of the “Reto No Sugar.” María José Braddick Serrano / The Tico TimesFirst things first: The social-media page is called “Reto No Sugar,” but Gatica focuses on more than just cutting out added sweeteners.“My goal is to help as many people as I can, help them choose a healthy lifestyle to change the alarming stats [heart disease] that we have,” he said. “I try to inspire through my real-life experiences because I almost died, and I have been there where you cannot stop eating chocolates, and you try to follow a diet, you go to the gym without eating well,  and you get tricked with those products that promise quick results.“Since I know what it’s like to be in that position, that is what I always remember when I give advice.”Gatica started his Instagram and Facebook accounts in January, and the growth has been remarkable — the two accounts have more than 60,000 combined followers. He says he initially wanted to help some of his friends live healthier lifestyles but soon realized he could have a bigger impact.About 500 people joined his first challenge, and he awarded $200 as prize money. And as the contest’s popularity grew, so too did his passion for the project.“The challenge is not about losing weight,” he said. “I am not a dietician nor a coach. I am just someone who wants to inspire others to improve [their health].”Breaking up with added sugar is not an easy task. (According to Eric Stice, a neuroscientist at the Oregon Research Institute, sugar activates the same brain regions as are activated when a person consumes drugs such as cocaine.) But I was determined to try it for myself.Gatica said many people go through energy and mood changes when they reduce their sugar intake, and that rang true for me. I did not know what to do with all the energy I seemed to have within a few days of cutting added sugars. At the same time, my mood was awful because I could not stop thinking about processed food and candy.Withdrawal symptoms, which can include headaches and fatigue, are common if your diet was high on sugar. However, eventually you will grow accustomed to a less-sugary lifestyle and won’t crave high-sugar snacks — at least that’s what I’m told. I am not there yet, but I plan to be soon. Costa Rica has a great variety of fruits and vegetables. María José Braddick Serrano / The Tico TimesBefore changing your diet, you should consult your dietician, according to Dr. Nancy Solano Avendaño, spokeswoman for the Costa Rican Professional Association of Dieticians. Every individual is different, and so are our nutrition necessities. Solano explained that to be able to create a nutrition plan, a professional should conduct a comprehensive evaluation of your lifestyle and consumption.The World Health Organization recommends less than 10% of an adult’s daily energy intake come from sugar.Gatica echoed the recommendation of visiting a dietician before making dramatic lifestyle changes, then recounted his own story.He says he had been overweight since he was child, even though he practiced tennis and soccer. As a young adult, he started smoking and drinking. When he became a professional player of a card game called “Magic: The Gathering,” he says his vices got worse. He would drink for hours, sleep and repeat the same routine day after day. Gatica before and after he decided to cut added sugars, and quit drinking and smoking. María José Braddick Serrano / The Tico TimesGatica’s father died of a heart attack in 2014, but it was not until 2016, when endured the death of his best friend, that he chose to turn his life around. He stopped smoking, and with the support of a dietician, he began to transform his lifestyle.“I start with mental health first, and then I introduce exercise and nutrition [when giving advice to others],” he said.Studies have tied heavy sugar consumption with mental problems. Fortunately, in Costa Rica you can find a variety of fresh no-sugar-added fruits and vegetables — in addition to nuts and meat — at local farmers’ markets. If you’re like me and have no clue what to buy, I recommend using Gatica’s social-media posts as inspiration. Otherwise, you’ll end up like me, with half a kilo of ginger that I don’t know what to do with. Representatives from the US Embassy attended the Costa Rican Cuisine Exhibition. María José Braddick Serrano / The Tico TimesGatica does not try to keep his advice private, nor does he hide it behind a paywall. He says he feels rewarded when he helps others — empathy-induced altruism.Gatica’s own life experiences inspired him to follow a less-sugared lifestyle, and his guidelines continue to rise in popularity. And best of all, reducing your intake of added sugars will help you to explore the great variety of fruits, vegetables and amazing natural ingredients Costa Rica has to offer. Related posts:The gluten-free movement is ruining the world’s love for pasta Meet your garden’s new best friend: baking soda PriceSmart supermarkets in Costa Rica recall frozen tilapia fish Best use for Costa Rican ginger? Delicious homemade ginger beerlast_img read more