Phoenix scores back-to-back wins, sends Mahindra to 0-3 start

first_imgPhoenix, however, experienced a bit of a scare in the fourth quarter when its 30-point lead, 105-75, after JC Intal slammed a two-hander on the break at the 9:08 mark, was cut to nine, 111-102 with 46.3 seconds remaining. Ariel Vanguardia’s men still held on to win, by virtue of its massive lead in the fourth, but he was livid after the game lamenting his team’s complacency down the stretch.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad Ali“I wasn’t too happy with the way we ended this game, and that shouldn’t be the case,” said Vanguardia after the Floodbuster went on a blistering 27-6 run to close the gap. “We should be attacking and playing defense.”JC Intal came off the bench anew and poured in a game-high 24 points for Phoenix that went with seven rebounds, four assists, and two blocks while rookie Matthew Wright added 21 points, 15 of which came from beyond the arc. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoenix kept its fire burning and razed woeful Mahindra, 114-104, for its second straight win in the 2017 PBA Philippine Cup Sunday at Mall of Asia Arena.After stunning defending champions San Miguel Beermen on Wednesday, the Fuel Masters continued their momentum and improved to 2-1 while sending the Floodbuster to a 0-3 record.ADVERTISEMENT Alex Mallari led Mahindra with 19 points while Philip Paniamogan pitched in 15.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next EDITORS’ PICK Baldwin: Ateneo will learn from Game 1 loss to La Salle Senators to proceed with review of VFA As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine We are young Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports MOST READ Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

Video: Mariyady, the priest investigating the corporate takeover of indigenous peoples’ forests in Borneo

first_img“Ghosts in the Machine” is an investigation by Mongabay and The Gecko Project, an initiative of the UK-based research house Earthsight.The article follows the money used to bribe Indonesia’s highest-ranking judge in 2013 to a series of massive land deals in the interior of Borneo, where a corrupt politician presided over a scheme to sell oil palm plantation licenses to a Malaysian firm.Short films produced in conjunction with the article feature some of the people affected by Hambit’s licensing scheme. One of them, a local priest named Mariyady, researched the contracts signed between villagers and the company, and determined they were ripped off by the compensation they were paid — he described it as “murder.” In the village of Tewah, in the heart of Indonesian Borneo, stands a wooden church named Immanuel. When the church was founded by German missionaries more than a century ago, Tewah would have been a very different place, surrounded by impenetrable rainforest, and accessible only via the Kahayan, a giant river flowing down from the mountains in the centre of the island. Today, Tewah is connected to surrounding villages by deeply rutted roads that cut through increasingly fragmented forests. Its narrow streets are dotted with shops that buy and sell gold, dredged up from the riverbeds by young indigenous men.The current custodian of the church is Mariyady, a charismatic priest with a young family and a Cheshire Cat smile. We heard about Mariyady in the nearby village of Sare Rangan, whose residents were navigating the complexities of a rapidly changing life, after discovering that their land had been licensed to a plantation firm to grow oil palms on a massive scale. The license was one of five issued by then district chief Hambit Bintih in 2012. These licenses were the subject of a 16-month investigation by Mongabay and The Gecko Project, in which we revealed how Hambit had used land deals to bankroll a corrupt election campaign in the district of Gunung Mas.The scheme worked like this: Hambit used his protégé, Cornelis Nalau Antun, to set up a series of shell companies. Then Hambit issued the shell companies with permits for vast areas of land encompassing dozens of villages, including Sare Rangan. Finally, the shell companies were sold to a Malaysian firm called CB Industrial Product. The villagers of Gunung Mas knew nothing of the way their land was being casually traded for millions of dollars — until stakes were planted to demarcate the companies’ concessions.Rainforest cleared for an oil palm estate near Sare Rangan. Image by Sandy Watt for The Gecko Project.When we met Dinur, the chief of Sare Rangan, he was dealing with the fallout of Hambit’s permit trading. It was an uphill battle; as is the case with most indigenous communities in Indonesia, the territorial rights of the Sare Rangan community were not recognized by state law. Dinur and other village leaders were engaged in a complex process of determining how to manage their society and resources, in the face of the greatest potential change they had ever faced. Some villagers had decided to relinquish their land to the company for meager compensation, though it was unclear what right, if any, they had to refuse.As rain poured down amid the fading light one afternoon in 2017, Dinur explained how the villagers had initially sought to oppose the plantation project. But then some of them gave in to the company’s entreaties, and bulldozers steadily began to move into their farms and the rainforest surrounding the village. Dinur said he didn’t know why they had dealt with the company. “I’m afraid,” he told us. “If the people sell their land, there will be no places to farm anymore. The land will be gone.”Dinur, the head of Sare Rangan village. Image by Sandy Watt for The Gecko Project.Dinur said his record of the contracts signed between villagers and the company, now a subsidiary of CB Industrial Product, had been taken by Mariyady, who was investigating the deals. We found Mariyady in his small wooden home next to Immanuel church on the banks of the Kahayan. He told us that, a decade earlier, he had been stationed in Sare Rangan as a young priest.“It was still pristine,” Mariyady said. “There was clean drinking water, a lot of forest. I would climb into the hills, into the forests that people said were sacred, haunted — because the trees were so large.”Mariyady at the church in Tewah. Image by Sandy Watt for The Gecko Project.After two years in Sare Rangan, Mariyady was transferred to another community. He returned in 2016 to lead the church across the subdistrict, from his perch in Tewah. But when he returned to Sare Rangan, he found the forest had been destroyed. His fear for the fate of the villagers was compounded by his experience in other areas in which plantations had taken hold, where clean drinking water was hard to come by, and conflicts simmered between large companies and local people.Mariyady began researching the contracts between the villagers and the company in Sare Rangan. He said the villagers were being ripped off by the compensation they were paid — he described it as “murder.” They would lose their rights to the land passed down to them through generations, which they relied upon for their livelihoods and sustenance, for at least 35 years. It was not yet clear what, if anything, they would receive in return.“For the community in Sare Rangan, there has been no contribution [from palm oil],” Mariyady said. “The forest was cut, the water is polluted. Now the land has been sold to investors, people won’t get it back for seven generations. There will be nowhere else for them to develop.”Mariyady blamed the district government for failing to protect the villages from exploitative land acquisitions. “The people are not to blame because they lack knowledge and education,” he said. “The real sinners are those in office.”Mariyady. Image by Sandy Watt for The Gecko Project.Our investigation showed the blame was well-placed. Hambit Bintih’s 2013 election campaign ended with an attempt to bribe the chief justice of the Constitutional Court, with money that appears to have come from the Gunung Mas land deals. The licenses nevertheless remain in place to this day. As the scandal faded from the public eye, community leaders like Mariyady were left to deal with the fallout, as companies took over indigenous lands and bulldozed their way through some of the world’s most ancient forests.Mariyady began using what he had learned, and his position, to urge villagers to resist the companies. But his was one of few voices in the face of a powerful nexus of corporate and political interests.Though Hambit Bintih was imprisoned (he later died while serving his sentence) the political establishment in Gunung Mas has scarcely changed. Hambit’s deputy took over his position, despite being his running mate in the corrupt 2013 election. On June 27 this year, some five years on from Hambit’s arrest, the district will return to the polls. Of the three candidates, one is Hambit’s son-in-law, while another is a businessman with a massive oil palm estate of his own.“These investors are killing the rights of the Dayak people,” Mariyady said, using a catchall term for the indigenous peoples of inner Borneo. “People who have been left behind. This is why I’m challenging this. But I have no right to make demands. All I can do is try to build the mentality of the community.”Watch our short film about Mariyady, below, to find out more. And then read our investigation into Hambit’s licenses, in English or Bahasa Indonesia.“Ghosts in the Machine” is the second installment of Indonesia for Sale, a series about the corruption behind Indonesia’s deforestation and land-rights crisis. The series is produced under a collaboration between Mongabay and The Gecko Project, an investigative reporting initiative established by the UK-based nonprofit Earthsight. Read the first installment, “The Palm Oil Fiefdom.” Banner: Mariyady at the church. Image by Sandy Watt for The Gecko Project.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Anonymous Companies, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corruption, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Wild-caught timber elephants in Myanmar die earlier than captive-born ones

first_imgMyanmar’s wild-caught timber elephants have higher rates of mortality and shorter life spans compared to those born in captivity, a new study has found.Among wild-caught individuals, elephants that were captured at older ages were worse off than those caught at younger ages, the researchers found.Wild-caught elephants also suffered the highest mortality rates during the first year after capture, which decreased slowly over subsequent years.The high number of deaths in the year following capture is likely related to capture-related injuries and trauma, followed by harsh taming, the authors say. In Myanmar, more than 5,000 elephants have been put to work in the logging industry over the past century, accounting for one of the world’s largest captive elephant populations. They include elephants caught from the wild and tamed, as well as elephants born in captivity.Both the wild-caught and captive-born elephants live, eat and work together, hauling logs by day and foraging in the forest by night. They are also subject to the same rules, including those governing workload, rest periods, retirement age and data recording.But there’s a key difference: Myanmar’s wild-caught timber elephants have higher rates of mortality and shorter life spans than those born in captivity, according to a new study published in Nature Communications.A Myanmar timber elephant hauling a log. Image by Virpi Lummaa.For more than a century, the government of Myanmar (formerly Burma) has maintained detailed records of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) employed in the timber industry, such as when an elephant was born, whether in the wild or in captivity; its age when it was tamed; and who its parents and offspring are. If the elephant was captured, then the records detailed how it was caught: whether it was part of a herd that had been driven into a stockade, whether it was immobilized by sedation or captured by lasso.By combing through this dataset of 5,150 timber elephants — of which 2,072 were captured from the wild between 1951 and 2000, and 3,078 were born in captivity between 1925 and 1999 — researchers found that wild-caught elephants had higher mortality rates than captive-born elephants at all ages, irrespective of how they were caught.“Our analysis reveals that wild-captured elephants had lower survival chances than captive-born elephants regardless of how they’d been captured, whether by stockade of whole groups, lassoing single elephants, or immobilisation by sedation,” lead author Mirkka Lahdenpera, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Turku, Finland, said in a statement. “This means that all these methods had an equally negative effect on the elephant’s subsequent life.”In fact, capture seemed to reduce the median life span of elephants by up to seven years compared to their captive-born peers. Among the wild-caught individuals, elephants that were captured at older ages were worse off than those caught at younger ages.The team also found that wild-caught elephants suffered the highest mortality rates during the first year after capture. This decreased slowly over subsequent years. Such a high number of deaths in the year following capture is likely related to capture-related injuries and trauma, followed by harsh taming, the authors say.For instance, captured elephants in Myanmar are “first broken and then trained to walk with hobbles to restrict their movement while night foraging,” the authors write, “and the older the elephants at capture, the more difficult it is to move around with hobbles (to which captive-born individuals are used to after their taming around age 5), which is also likely to restrict their nutritional intake.”This capture and training likely induces chronic stress in captured elephants, they add. However, there are currently no studies that directly compare stress in wild-captured and captive-born elephants kept in similar systems.The Myanmar government banned the wild capture of elephants in 1994. But the pachyderms continue to be captured throughout Southeast and South Asia to sustain populations in zoos, and for research and conservation programs.“The long-term overall cost of capture and taming resulted in a median lifespan that is 3-7 years shorter than that of captive-born elephants,” said Virpi Lummaa, the study’s senior investigator and an academy professor at the University of Turku. “Capturing elephants to sustain captive populations is, consequently, detrimental, because it not just reduces wild populations of this endangered species, but it also cannot provide a viable solution to sustain captive populations. These wild-caught animals live shorter lives and reproduce poorly in captivity.”Most captured elephants are taken from the wild at a relatively young age. Image by Virpi Lummaa.Citation:Lahdenperä, M., Mar, K. U., Courtiol, A., & Lummaa, V. (2018). Differences in age-specific mortality between wild-caught and captive-born Asian elephants. Nature communications, 9(1), 3023.Banner image of Asian elephant by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Forest Elephants, Forests, Green, Mammals, Research, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Largely banned industrial chemicals could wipe out killer whales, study warns

first_imgNew research shows that despite countries phasing out polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) more than 40 years ago, the chemicals remain a major threat to killer whales around the world, and could wipe out most populations in just 30 to 50 years.Killer whale populations that occur in least PCB-polluted parts of the ocean, such as those around the poles, Norway and Iceland, still have a large number of individuals and are at low risk.However, populations occurring in waters that have had historically high concentrations of PCBs, such as those around Japan, Brazil, the northeast Pacific, the Strait of Gibraltar, and the U.K., are all tending toward complete collapse in the next few decades, according to the study’s modeled scenarios. A few decades ago, most countries phased out the manufacture and use of a highly toxic group of industrial chemicals called polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs. But the dangers of these largely banned pollutants still linger on. New research shows that PCBs remain a major threat to killer whales around the world, and could wipe out most populations in just 30 to 50 years.From the 1930s to 1993, the world produced an estimated 1.5 million metric tons of PCBs. The chemicals were used in a wide range of applications, including paints, electronic cables and components, plastics, flame retardants, sealants, and adhesives. At the same time, there was increasing evidence showing that PCBs were extremely toxic: studies found that they could cause cancer, impair the immune system and reproduction, disrupt hormone signals and have a range of other effects on health. PCBs were, in fact, believed to be so dangerous that several countries, including the United States, banned the chemicals through the 1970s and 1980s, and many others followed suit after the 2001 Stockholm Convention. These hardy chemicals, however, have continued to persist in the environment: PCBs have been found deep in the Mariana Trench and even in the Arctic snow.In PCB-contaminated parts of the ocean, killer whales or orcas (Orcinus orca) are struggling to survive, researchers report in the new study published in Science.The problem is that PCBs degrade very slowly in the environment. They also tend to accumulate in fatty tissues of animals, their concentration increasing up the food chain — the higher up an animal is, the higher the amount of PCBs in its fatty tissues. Killer whales are top predators, occupying the final link in a long food chain, and have been recorded to have up to 1,300 milligrams per kilogram of PCBs in their fatty tissue, or blubber. This is over 25 times the levels that have been shown to affect fertility and immunity. Moreover, since PCB is fat-soluble, female orcas can pass on PCBs to their offspring through their fat-rich milk.To see how PCBs affect killer whales, researchers of the recent study compiled available data on blubber PCB concentrations in 351 killer whales from populations around the world, and modeled the effects of the PCBs on the orcas’ rates of survival and reproduction and growth of populations.“We know that PCBs deform the reproductive organs of animals such as polar bears,” study co-author Rune Dietz, a professor of bioscience at Aarhus University in Denmark, said in a statement. “It was therefore only natural to examine the impact of PCBs on the scarce populations of killer whales around the world.”Dietz and colleagues found that in 10 out of the 19 killer whale populations they investigated, the number of whales was rapidly declining. Killer whale populations that occur in parts of the ocean least polluted by PCBs, such as those around the poles, Norway and Iceland, still have a large number of individuals and are at low risk. However, populations occurring in waters that have had historically high concentrations of PCBs, such as those around Japan, Brazil, the northeast Pacific, the Strait of Gibraltar, and the U.K., are all tending toward complete collapse in the next few decades, according to the study’s modeled scenarios.“As the effects have been recognized for more than 50 years, it is frightening to see that the models predict a high risk of population collapse in these areas within a period of 30-40 years,” said lead author Jean-Pierre Desforges, a postdoctoral researcher at Aarhus University.In fact, newborn killer whales have rarely been observed in these areas, added co-author Ailsa Hall, director of the Scottish Oceans Institute’s Sea Mammal Research Unit.New research finds that 10 out of 19 populations of killer whales are affected by high levels of PCBs in their bodies. Image courtesy of Aarhus University.The killer whales’ diet matters too: whales that tend to eat large-sized prey like seals, tuna and sharks have high concentrations of PCBs in their bodies and are at the highest risk of population collapse. Those that eat mostly small fish such as herring and mackerel have lower amounts of PCBs and are at lower risk. Some killer whale populations, like those around northeast Scotland and Greenland, have been observed to have altered their diet, switching from low- to high-PCB-contaminated prey sources (such as from fish to seals), which the researchers say is likely to alter their exposure to PCBs and affect their health.PCBs are just one among several pollutants that could be affecting killer whales. However, exposure to PCBs alone can cause killer whale populations to collapse, the researchers say. Moreover, despite countries committing to phase out PCBs more than 40 years ago, more than 80 percent of global PCB stocks are yet to be destroyed, with killer whales continuing to accumulate high levels of the chemicals in their bodies.“This suggests that the efforts have not been effective enough to avoid the accumulation of PCBs in high trophic level species that live as long as the killer whale does,” said co-author Paul D. Jepson, an expert on orcas at the Zoological Society of London’s Institute of Zoology. “There is therefore an urgent need for further initiatives than those under the Stockholm Convention.”Crispin Halsall, an environmental chemist at Lancaster University in the U.K., who was not involved in the study, said “the legacy of PCBs will continue to haunt us for some while to come.”“Scientists estimate that the final resting place or ‘sink’ for PCBs is likely to be organic rich soils across the Northern Hemisphere or even ocean sediments,” Halsall wrote in the Conversation. “However, in the meantime, PCBs continue to cycle around the environment and are still present in mother’s milk. Maternal transfer from adult female to calf is the key exposure route for most marine mammals and this chemical stress (supplemented by an array of chemical pollutants other than PCBs), alongside climate change induced stress, is a major concern.”Over half of the world’s killer whale populations are declining. Image by Audun Rikardsen.Citation:Desforges J., et al (2018). Predicting global killer whale population collapse from PCB pollution. Science, 2018 DOI: 10.1126/science.aat1953 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Green, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Oceans, Pollution, Research, Water Pollution, Whales, Wildlife center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more