Leak suggests OnePlus 7 Pro will not come cheap

first_img Verdict The OnePlus 7 Pro manages to innovate in one of the most competitive technology markets out there while still circumventing convention by undercutting the majority of the competition on cost. Even if wireless charging and water resistance aren’t part of the equation, It has one of the nicest displays you’ll find on a phone, is a superb performer, offers great battery life and the camera is always improving. Cons Oxygen OS user experience Stunning 90Hz HDR display Top-notch performance Great battery life Page 5 Performance Review Page 2 Camera Review Page 4 Screen Review Page 1 OnePlus 7 Pro Review The OnePlus 7 Pro has the best display currently available on a phone, the latest internals and a design that takes a lot of inspiration from the Samsung Galaxy S10. It’s also the priciest OnePlus phone yet, moving away from the company’s idea of offering high-end specs for a bargain price.Despite starting life as a plucky underdog, however, OnePlus has had to grow up fast and nothing highlights the momentum the company has amassed like its debut entrants into the phone market for 2019: the OnePlus 7 and OnePlus 7 Pro.The OnePlus 7 Pro is for those who want the best the company has to offer and a phone that packs in enough to compete with the latest rival flagships; devices like the Samsung Galaxy S10 Plus and Huawei P30 Pro. Page 6 OnePlus 7 Pro 5G Review Review Price: £649 Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 128GB/256GB internal storage 6GB/8GB/12GB RAM 6.67-inch QHD+ 90Hz Fluid AMOLED 48MP main camera w/ OIS 16MP ultra-wide 117-degree sensor 8MP tele w/ OIS + 3x optical zoom 16MP pop-up front camera 30W Warp Charge fast-charging 4000mAh battery Pros Related: Interested in 5G? Check out our OnePlus 7 Pro 5G reviewOnePlus 7 Pro design brings a new level of attention to detailThe OnePlus 7 Pro looks and feels unlike anything the company has produced thus far. While the standard OnePlus 7 bears more than a passing resemblance to last year’s OnePlus 6T, the Pro model is a wholly different beast.The lessons that Oppo learnt creating its Find X 2018 flagship may well have played a part in the engineering used by OnePlus’ new star player (as OnePlus uses Oppo’s production facilities to build its phones), based on not just its looks but the way it feels too.Almost bezel-freeAn expansive and near bezel-free curved display stretches across the phone’s front, granting it an impressive 88.6 percent screen-to-body ratio; one of the highest of any current smartphone. Essentially, when looking at the front of the 7 Pro, all you’ll see is screen, especially thanks to the display’s curved edges.Related: Amazon Prime Day Smartphone DealsWith a curved Gorilla Glass front mirrored by the phone’s curved glass back, the metal frame that sits within this sandwich is decidedly thin, but in spite of this, the phone still feels sturdy and well-built.There’s still room for OnePlus’ signature physical alert slider along its right side – a defining feature on the company’s phones that lets you quickly switch between ringing, vibrating and silent sound profiles without having to look; it’s a small but important bonus that you’d miss, were it taken away.With no notch or hole-punch camera to speak of, OnePlus has instead opted for a motorised pop-up front-facing snapper, akin to the one found on the Vivo Nex (although this one looks and feels a lot more robust).It’s quick enough for face unlocking and, as with every phone that’s integrated such a system, comes with claims of rigorous testing and reliability.Related: Best Android phoneOnePlus states that the phone’s front camera mechanism has withstood some 300,000 actuations during testing, without any sign of lag, slowdown or breakage. There’s fall detection in there too, which will pull the camera back inside the moment the phone detects itself hurtling towards the ground.Collectively, you should feel comforted by these assurances, but as ever, in the real world, I still have my doubts about the longevity of any moving parts on a phone, especially one a delicate and intricate as a motorised camera unit.For all the care and attention OnePlus has poured into the aesthetics of the 7 Pro, such beauty does come at a practical sacrifice that some might not be willing to overlook.For a start, with a 6.67-inch, 19.5:9 display; this is a very big device – OnePlus’ largest ever. It’s almost identical in width to its predecessor but notably taller, plus those narrow metal sides give you less purchase, making one-handed use precarious.Add to that a complete lack of any one-handed mode within the software and elements at the top of the screen within apps (such as the placement of Instagram’s story ‘bubbles’) require two hands or a risky shimmy up and down the phone’s body to be pulled in reach of a thumb.There’s also the matter of the finish of the phone. I appreciate OnePlus’ decision to shy away from a boring all-black body, instead offering up three colours at launch (partially tied to different RAM and storage configurations).For the base 6GB RAM/128GB internal storage SKU your only option is ‘Mirror Gray’ – an understated colourway for those uninterested in flash and flare, or ideal if you’re looking to slap a case on it immediately. This is the closest thing to black on offer from this generation of OnePlus.Fork out for the 8GB/256GB model and you have the full gamut of colours available to you. Mirror Gray is accompanied by ‘Almond’ – a mix of polished gold metal and an iridescent cream tone set behind glass, similar in styling to a gold iPhone XS. Nebula Blue is arguably the biggest head-turner and the finish that my review unit (pictured) came in.While all three looks deserve praise for their ‘understated cool’, if you’re planning on going caseless, ergonomics once again come into play. The gloss finish of the Mirror Gray and Almond models backs attract fingerprints as readily as any of their competitors, while the finely-textured glass given to the Nebula Blue model will remain comparatively smudge-free.The trade-off is that the blue model’s treated rear also lacks grip which, paired with it’s already unwieldy form, pushes the chance of the phone slipping from your fingers way up. While I haven’t asked OnePlus directly, I have no doubt that the 7 Pro’s fancy new screen isn’t cheap to replace. You have been warned.Related: OnePlus 7 ReviewThe OnePlus 7 display is the first truly competitive mobile HDR screenOn a more positive note, that display is nothing short of exceptional. Out the box, it may not be as accurately tuned as some of its rivals’ screens but there are plenty of tools to customise the viewing experience should you wish to tinker around.The company also lauded the screen’s A+ rating from independent body DisplayMate, before the 7 Pro had even officially launched, just in case there was any doubt about its capabilities.HDR visuals on 6.67-inch display are stunningIt’s the first time we’ve seen a OnePlus screen transcend above Full HD+ resolution. This Quad HD+ panel is also HDR10 complaint, with approved support for services like Netflix – a popular service that previously only offered limited support for OnePlus devices.Related: What is HDR?The ‘Fluid AMOLED’ panel, as OnePlus calls it, gets its name not just from the inky blacks and vivid colours it can push out, but the intriguing 90Hz refresh rate that it supports.Although you can manually dial it down to 60Hz, as most phones use (or have it jump down when battery saver mode is activated), the 7 Pro’s screen remains fixed at 90Hz. The result is an effortlessly smooth-looking user experience that lends itself perfectly to the idea that this is a cutting-edge handset.Seeing really is believing, especially as only a handful of other devices offer anything close to what OnePlus has cooked up here.Apple’s ProMotion technology, along with the Asus ROG Phone‘s OLED and the Razer Phone series’ IGZO displays all have the ability to operate at refresh rates notably higher than 60Hz, but in the smartphone space, the OnePlus 7 Pro might be the most approachable and mainstream handset to showcase such technology.There are known concerns around the impact on battery life leaving the smooth 90Hz setting on all the time might have, but based on the longevity I experienced without ever switching it off (or rather, down to 60Hz), I’d just enjoy its inclusion and how it elevates acts as simple as swiping around the interface.The worst thing about the feature? You really notice its absence when using any phone that doesn’t support it.The display smarts don’t stop there. There’s also the integrated optical in-display fingerprint sensor – an evolution on the feature that OnePlus introduced with last year’s 6T.This time around, OnePlus has enlarged the sensor’s read area and reduced latency; all I can say is that it feels much faster and more reliable than its predecessor, even if it can still be tripped up by particularly cold or wet hands.With next-to-no bezel, there’s no notification LED to speak of, so instead light pulses down the curved edges of the display in the corresponding app colour to great effect – a feature that both Samsung and Oppo have used on curved-display laden devices.OnePlus 7 Pro camera has greater versatility, but is that enough?OnePlus has kept up with principle imaging trends in the realm of smartphone photography, and the OnePlus 7 Pro makes the same move that many of its contemporaries already have; implementing a triple-sensor on the back.The 7 Pro’s three-lens arrangement is comprised of a 48-megapixel main snapper with OIS (optical image stabilisation), an 8-megapixel telephoto sensor, again with OIS, that grants the phone 3x lossless optical zoom, while a 16-megapixel ultra-wide angle sensor, with an impressive 117-degree field of view, rounds things out.Related: Best camera phonesOnePlus has worked hard to ensure the hardware is put to good use, with the phone boasting enhanced versions of the company’s Nightscape (version 2.0) scene mode and pixel-binning technology (condensing the image data of four pixels into one to reduce shake and noise) as a result of that huge 48-megapixel main sensor.The ultra-wide angle sensor lets you fit more in-frame, only adding to the 7 Pro’s photographic versatility.The quality of the telephoto snapper also left me impressed, with pleasing detail retention. Its narrower aperture means images do, however, suffer in low-light shootingMain sensor (left), telephoto (right) – drag the white slide bar to compare the two imagesAs for low-light photography, I was surprised by the results produced by the phone, but not in a good way. OnePlus worked hard to improve the low light capabilities of last year’s OnePlus 6 and 6T, but this new hardware is clearly trickier to tune. As before, we’ll likely see subsequent software updates that rectify the phone’s current low light capabilities which I’m hoping will improve with time.The newly-updated Nightscape mode certainly helps alleviate general low-light shooting but over-corrects, with hard-hitting sharpening and mismanaged colour correction that give shots an unnatural finish.For a true deep-dive into this phone’s imaging capabilities, jump over to our full OnePlus 7 Pro camera review.The OnePlus 7 Pro performance is stunningThe OnePlus X notwithstanding OnePlus isn’t in the business on skimping on performance. When you buy a OnePlus phone, you know you’re getting a top-notch processor and complementary smarts to match. Never has that been truer than with the OnePlus 7 Pro.I already mentioned the memory and storage options that the 7 Pro is available in, which range from generous to pure excess (with up to an additional £150 in tow) but speed and power are everywhere within the phone’s internals.The latest and greatest 7nm Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 chipset takes charge, which is also how OnePlus is able to convert the 7 Pro into the OnePlus 7 Pro 5G – the 5G-capable brother to the standard model that also integrates Qualcomm’s complementary X50 5G modem.Then there’s the inclusion of Universal Flash Storage 3.0. OnePlus has managed to beat Samsung to the punch after the Korean tech giant had to pull its first foldable, the Galaxy Fold, before launch as a result of engineering and reliability issues.Related: Samsung Galaxy Fold – The final chapterWith the Fold out of the way, it looks as though the OnePlus 7 Pro will be the first phone on the market to support UFS 3.0, with Samsung following with the rumoured Galaxy Note 10 later into 2019.The technology is theoretically up to twice as fast when it comes to read and write speeds, which affects everything from app load times to file transfers.There’s so much powerful hardware here that I can’t find fault with the 7 Pro’s performance, and this new addition only serves to help the 7 Pro take the lead in an area that its pricier competitors still haven’t ventured.OnePlus 7 Pro battery life goes beyond expectationThe story of speed on the OnePlus 7 Pro doesn’t stop with the phone’s fluid user experience and raw performance; it sports suitably solid fast charging technology too.We first encountered the company’s Warp Charge feature on last year’s OnePlus 6T McLaren Edition and it’s now become part of the mainstream offering here.The 30W Warp Charge adapter and complimentary cable are unquestionably sizeable (although the previous generation Dash/Fast Charger wasn’t really any more compact) but the convenience they bring nullifies the hassle of carrying them around.The 7 Pro’s large footprint means it’s also able to carry a hefty 4000mAh battery within its belly and, with the included Warp Charger, that sizeable cell can be refilled from flat to full in under an hour and twenty. What really impresses is the initial charge rate, however.A third of the battery can be filled in just 15 minutes and more than a day’s worth of juice can be replenished within 30. Most of the battery can be charged within an hour too, so you never have to wait long to give the 7 Pro a meaningful top up.While quick in their own right, OnePlus’ fast-charging capabilities are no longer industry-leading; Huawei has instead taken that crown. The OnePlus 7 Pro does also lag slightly behind due to its lack of any form of wireless charging – an absentee feature that the company has explained may never be part of the equation on its devices.As for longevity, the OnePlus 7 Pro, left me thoroughly impressed. While charging the OnePlus 7 Pro is a lot less painless an experience compared to some phones (I’m looking at you Apple), not having to charge it all was an even bigger win.I was consistently reaching two days of use and up to 5 hours of screen-on time on a single charge, which is well above most modern phones’ more approachable promised day-long endurance.If I had flipped the refresh rate down to 60Hz or relied on battery saver mode at all, there’s every chance the phone would have lasted even longer.Little has changed with OnePlus 7 Pro software, and that’s no bad thingAndroid 9.0 underpins the software experience on this generation of OnePlus phones but the company’s OxygenOS overlay (version 9.5.2 as tested) is what you’re actually navigating around. It’s a great tweaked take on base Android that’s slick and clean, easy-to-use and powerful.Integrated gestures make it easier to summon the notifications and quick settings (particularly useful with the 7 Pro’s tall display), as well as activating features like the camera and the flashlight without ever having to wake the phone up.‘The Shelf’ is a dedicated space for iOS-like widget placement which keeps things tidy, and there’s a hidden ‘second space’ where you can place apps that you want to hide from prying eyes should you hand your phone to a friend. These are all pre-existing features, however.Notable new additions for the 7 Pro include an enhanced gaming mode that silences notifications and locks screen brightness down, or by enabling ‘fnatic mode’ the phone directs all CPU, GPU and memory usage to your current gaming session and nowhere else.The new Zen mode was born from the mindfulness practices of OnePlus’ senior staffers and takes a hard stance on pervasive phone checking by locking down everything, save for emergency calls, incoming calls and camera access, for 20 minutes at a time.Not even restarting or powering the phone off and back on can you escape out of this experience, so make sure that you’re ready for the break, before committing.The feature feels like OnePlus’ extension of Android Pie’s native digital wellbeing toolset and as with much of what makes the 7 Pro decidedly OnePlus, it’s an odd inclusion but one that I appreciate nonetheless.Should I buy the OnePlus 7 Pro?When I first took delivery of the OnePlus 7 Pro, I wasn’t told how much it would cost (that information came later), and I was a little worried.This phone is undoubtedly feature-packed, the richest the company has ever made, but its higher price warrants greater scrutiny. Previous OnePlus phones have always been pit against the flagships of the time but the comparative affordability they’ve offered has absolved them of any minor shortcomings that would otherwise have been met with disappointment or beratement.Even so, the OnePlus 7 Pro still undercuts the majority of the 2019 flagship pack (by several hundred pounds in some cases), meaning I can forgive the absence of features like (certified) water resistance and wireless charging – this phone will still leave you impressed (and with more money in your pocket).Related: Is the OnePlus 7 series water resistant?Where Huawei’s P30 Pro takes the cake for smartphone camera and battery ability, the OnePlus 7 Pro’s screen is easily one of the nicest I’ve clapped eyes on, plus OnePlus’ user experience is among the best skinned Android experiences you’ll find out there.The OnePlus 7 Pro shows that the company is able to grow, bring about meaningful changes and greater competition without losing what makes the brand and its devices so uniquely appealing. Key Specifications Underwhelming cameras No wireless charging No water resistance Large and unwieldy Sections Page 3 Battery Life Review Unlike other sites, we thoroughly test every product we review. We use industry standard tests in order to compare features properly. We’ll always tell you what we find. We never, ever accept money to review a product. Tell us what you think – send your emails to the Editor.last_img read more

Bicycles could soon be VATfree in EU but ebikes still taxed like

The EU, in its ever-increasing push towards sustainability, is considering reducing or removing value added tax (VAT) on bicycles. However, many are upset that electric bicycles are not included in the same category. more…The post Bicycles could soon be VAT-free in EU, but e-bikes still taxed like gas vehicles appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forward

Daimler CEO Says Automaker Is Still Open To Working With Tesla

first_img Daimler Says EVs Less Profitable Than Conventional Vehicles…Also World Is Round Daimler CEO Says Tesla Took The “Granola” Out Of The Electric Car Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 29, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Source: Electric Vehicle News Few People Realize Elon Musk Saved Tesla And SpaceX Simultaneously Mercedes-Benz A-Class E-CELLDieter Zetsche seems open to further cooperation with Tesla, but we rather shouldn’t read this as an announcement. It’s more like a pragmatic approach to not exclude any options. There is also no intention to buy Tesla shares again.We don’t know what the future will bring, but even if the roads of Daimler and Tesla join again, it will be not under Zetsche who leaves Daimler’s CEO position in May 2019.Here is what Elon Musk said in the past about the Tesla investment:Musk: “Without Daimler, Tesla would not exist. Daimler saved Tesla.”Zetsche: “At the time the investment was relatively important for Tesla, because they had some difficulties at the time to go to the next financing round. I believe the money that we have invested and the other investors that followed helped Tesla back then.” Source: Reuters Daimler’s 2009 investment in Tesla was crucial.Dieter Zetsche – in one of the latest interviews – was asked about Daimler‘s $50 million investment in Tesla in 2009 and later sales of shares for some $780 million in 2014. The move apparently saved Tesla from bankruptcy (other investors followed Daimler at a later stage) and fruited in EV conversion projects (smart fortwo ED, Mercedes-Benz A-Class E-CELL low-volume and thousands of Mercedes-Benz B-Class Electric Drive).Zetsche said: “never regretted it. This does not exclude a cooperation in the future.”Well, it was a good business deal for Daimler in the end, as we could assume that all the early EVs were financed from the increased price of Tesla shares. However, at the same time Daimler bred not only a competitor for Mercedes-Benz but for the entire automotive industry and now needs to work harder for its market share.See Alsolast_img read more

Jaguar Still Committed To Formula E Despite Upcoming Cuts

first_img Marrakesh Formula E: BMW Implosion Hands Mahindra Victory Da Costa Takes Blame For BMW On BMW Crash In Formula E James Barclay says the Jaguar ABB FIA Formula E team remains committed to racing in the championship despite its parent company recently announcing it will cut thousands of jobs.Jaguar Land Rover revealed last week that it will cut 4,500 jobs from its global operations, with the majority of them hitting management roles in the UK and the company set to start a voluntary redundancy programme. More Formula E News Source: Electric Vehicle Newscenter_img But Barclay, the FE squad’s team principal, stated that Jaguar would carry on racing for the “longer-term” as it fits with the manufacturer’s recent drive towards electrification on its road car models.“it’s an unprecedented time for the car industry,” he told Motorsport.com.“A lot of geopolitical factors are affecting the industry at the moment – a slowdown in China, slowdown in diesel sales and we have that small matter of Brexit in the UK, which is affecting consumer confidence.“So, we have to take some key decisions now to protect the long-term future of our company. [It’s] really important we make those steps now.“But at the same time, we also announced that we’ll be building electric drive units at our engine manufacturing plant in Wolverhampton and also building a battery plant in Birmingham.“That is a big statement about the future and our Formula E programme, focusing on using it as a real-world test bed for electrification technology and a platform to tell the world that we have world-class expertise in electric vehicles, is really important to our future.“We have to take some key decisions now to protect our future and this activity is very much about our future.“So it’s a really important programme – our company is very much focused on the future and we have to build an exciting but also a profitable future.“And this programme is very important to that, both in the technical learning, but also the communication points with regards to battery electric vehicles.”When asked if Jaguar’s commitment to FE would be reviewed in the the future, Barclay said: “From our perspective, assuming what we know at the moment [and] you can never predict everything, but as far as we’re concerned, it’s a longer-term commitment.“We were the first premium brand into FE, we took that decision early, we’re now at the key time when the world’s major manufacturers have joined us in the championship as well.“We’ve introduced the eTrophy, the new Jaguar I-PACE has proved to be an immediate success for us – it’s been very well received by the world’s media.“So, from our point of view, there’s no doubt electrification is the key to our future.“For us, absolutely, we’re here for the longer-term.“But other factors in the world change, [so] we may have to make other decisions. But right now, from what we know, this is our commitment.” Vergne Has New Approach For Formula E Title Defense Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 16, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

NXT Rage Electric Motorcycle The Next Thing

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News Lightning Shows How New Strike Electric Motorcycle Will Ride Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 17, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News RMK’s E2 Electric Motorcycle: Apparently Not Vaporware While details are thin, and they always are just ahead of a launch like this, we do at least get some interesting photographs of the one or two concept bikes NXT has built to date. We know a couple of things about the bike. It’s fully electric, it’s going to be marketed as a commuter (so the mileage will likely not be impressive), it has an upright riding position, it’s Belgian…OK there are also clues in the photos, like the carbon fiber goodies (though, there is a high likelihood those won’t make it on production models to keep costs down), a monoshock out back and traditional forks up front. There are two brake discs up front with double piston calipers and one out back with a single piston. It’s got a chain final drive, bars not clipons, a single naked headlight, and something akin to Tesla’s iPad-glued-to-the-dashboard style of instrument panel.The body styling is a bit on the boring, blobby side but that’s common on electric bikes. We either stare at the vast blank uninteresting expanse of an electric motor, or we stare at the vast blank uninteresting expanse of all the plastic that covers it. Very few builders have made a sexy bike that plugs in, and this one is no exception, all of its marketing-speak notwithstanding (“where raw meets rage!”).There are exactly no published numbers for this bike yet. We don’t know what it weighs or its charge time or range or anything. If you are lucky enough to live near Utrecht, the Netherlands, though, you can attend what looks like a real killer of a motorcycle show this weekend (dubbed “MotorBeurs” which roughly translates to “motor fellowship” but probably means something way more interesting in Dutch). The NXT Rage will be there in all its blobby concept glory.Sources: EVNerds, NXTMotors, NXTMotorsFB, MotorBeursUtrecht Electric Motorcycle Ignites In Traffic, Burns To The Ground: Video We’re living through an electric bike revolution, everybody.It is certainly going to take a while for all of the electric motorcycle companies to shake out, but while we are in this revolution let’s just sit back and enjoy the show for a little while, shall we?NXT has launched its electric motorcycle, dubbed “Rage.” That might not be such an auspicious name for a little electric bike from a company that comes right out and calls it a commuter first and foremost. Or maybe it’s just really good target marketing.More E-Bikeslast_img read more

Jay Inslee announces presidential bid says defeating climate change number one priority

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D) announced he’ll be running for president in 2020, and his announcement makes defeating climate change the primary goal of his campaign. more…The post Jay Inslee announces presidential bid, says defeating climate change ‘number one priority’ appeared first on Electrek.last_img

SK Innovation To Build New Battery Separator Plant In Poland

first_img Volkswagen’s Gigafactory Plans Threatened By LG Chem Objections? Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 7, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News SK Innovation Plans 100 GWh Of Battery Production Capacity SK Innovation Begins Construction Of 7.5 GWh Battery Plant In Hungary SK Innovation secures supplies of battery separators for lithium-ion batteriesSK Innovation announced a new battery separator plant to be built in Poland, in the southern part of the country (Województwo Śląskie), as part of a plan to establish a global production base and become a leader in the separator market. The project will be led by a new subsidiary SK hi-tech battery materials Poland Sp. z o.o.Localization of the 270,000 sqm site is a stone’s throw from the LG Chem plant (also in Poland), as well as not far from SK Innovation battery plant in Hungary, rumored plant in Germany and other battery factories in this part of Europe (Samsung SDI in Hungary, announced CATL plant in Germany).SK Innovation news The investment of €335 million ($376 million) is set to begin in Q3 2019 and the factory will be completed in Q3 2021, reaching an annual output of:340 million square meters of LiBS130 million square meters of CCS (ceramic coating)Together with 360 million square meters of LiBS per year plant in Jeungpyeong, Chungcheongbuk-do, South Korea and 500 million square meters of LiBS plant in China, the total output of LiBS to be 1.2 billion square meters per year.More from the press release:“On 27th of March, SK Innovation announced that it will build a new production plant for Lithium-ion Battery Separator (LiBS) and Ceramic Coated Separator (CCS) in Województwo Śląskie, Poland.SK Innovation, a leading energy and chemical company in Korea, is engaged in various fields from oil refining, chemicals, lubricants, petroleum development to EV batteries and battery separators. SK Innovation became the world’s third company to succeed in developing Wet-Type LiBS in 2004.SK Innovation plans to invest EUR 335 million to build four LiBS production units and three CCS production units in the 270,000 sqm site located in Województwo Śląskie. The plant will break ground in the third quarter of this year and begin mass production in the third quarter of 2021. The annual capacity of the plant is estimated to be 340 million square meters of LiBS and 130 million square meters of CCS.SK Innovation recently announced a series of plans to build plants in other countries including China and Poland. Currently it produces 360 million square meters of LiBS per year in Jeungpyeong, Chungcheongbuk-do, Korea, and the completion of overseas plants in China and Poland will increase SK Innovations’ production capacity to 1.2 billion square meters per year.SK Innovation recently established ‘SK hi-tech battery materials Poland Sp. z o.o.’, a wholly owned limited company.It is expected that SK Innovation will be able to rapidly provide separator products to major customers in the European market when the plant in Poland is completed. In addition, SK Innovation believes that it will make tangible results in Europe where global EV original equipment manufacturers (OEM) and EV battery providers are competing fiercely with each other.” Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

SGL Carbon Presents Composite Battery Enclosures For NIO

first_imgThe enclosure made from CFRP is 40% lighter and brings several other benefitsSource: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

Free 90 Minute 2017 FCPA Year In Review Video

first_imgThanks to Kreller Group for sponsoring my 2017 FCPA Year in Review Video.The 90 minute video tutorial provides an overview of every corporate enforcement action in 2017; highlights notable statistics and issues to consider from 2017; discusses compliance take-away points from 2017 enforcement actions; and covers enforcement agency policy and related developments in 2017.The free video can be downloaded here.last_img

This Week On FCPA Professor

first_imgFCPA Professor has been described as “the Wall Street Journal concerning all things FCPA-related,” and “the most authoritative source for those seeking to understand and apply the FCPA.”Set forth below are the topics discussed this week on FCPA Professor.In honor of Presidents Day, this post highlights the roles of the Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and William Clinton administrations in enactment and subsequent development of FCPA legal authority.This post continues the analysis of the recent Cognizant Technology enforcement action by highlighting several additional issues to consider.This post checks in on WalMart’s pre-enforcement action professional fees and expenses which now stand at approximately $910 million.In this FCPA Flash podcast episode, James Noe (special counsel with Jones Walker) discusses FCPA issues in the oil and gas industry.This post checks in on the Dmitry Firtash FCPA enforcement action and his motion to dismiss.This post highlights several um, excuse me but … type moments relevant to the FCPA.This post provides updates on long-standing FCPA scrutiny of the following companies: Fresenius, Herbalife, and TechnipFMC as well as an update from across the pond in the United Kingdom concerning GlaxoSmithKline and  individuals associated with Rolls Royce.Elevate your FCPA knowledge and practical skills at the FCPA Institute – Nashville on April 11-12. CLE credit is available. Can’t attend the live, in-person FCPA Institute? No problem, the FCPA Institute is also online and is the most comprehensive online FCPA training course available.last_img read more

Ted Baroody Moves to Carstens Cahoon

first_img Remember me Password Lost your password? Usernamecenter_img Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. © 2014 The Texas Lawbook.By Brooks Igo – (July 7) – Dallas-based IP boutique Carstens & Cahoon announced last week that patent litigator Ted Baroody joined the firm as a partner from Haynes and Boone. The SMU Dedman School of Law graduate has handled patent litigation matters involving technologies including telecommunications, websites and Internet search. He has also litigated trade secrets matters involving software and firmware related to power stations burner management systems, software for oilfield seismic survey equipment and processes for semiconductor fabrication.“The diverse group of established patent and trademark . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.last_img read more

In Memoriam Rob Mayer

first_imgby, Barry Barkan, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShare22ShareEmail22 SharesRest in peace, Rob Mayer. It’s hard for me to write these words, because his energetic image is emblazoned in my mind.Rob was rare in that he brought the approach of a social venture capitalist to his role as executive director of the The Hulda B. & Maurice L. Rothschild Foundation. He sought out cutting edge work that was aligned with his purpose and became a full partner with the organizations in whom he invested the foundation’s resources. He shared not just the Foundation’s money but he negotiated the fine line between sharing his seasoned strategic advice and not imposing it on his partners.It was Rob who approached the Pioneer Network in the early days with an unsolicited offer of support and he grew to be so invested in the cause that the Rothschild Foundation became “the only national philanthropy exclusively committed to person-centered long-term care in the United States.”We both had major heart surgeries and developed an intimacy around health issues. In an email conversation we had in July, shortly after I learned that Rob had a dire diagnosis, he wrote:“You are absolutely correct that each journey is an individual one both in how we respond clinically as well as psychologically. Not something that anything prepares us for, as the onset is almost always sudden, and the outcome is highly unpredictable in almost every case as you well know.“However, I am passionately dedicated to the Work and that is what keeps me going. Fortunately, the clinical markers are positive so far and the worst of the side effects from the radiation and chemo I trust are behind me. The Foundation is promoting a new product we created to promote resident choice by better mitigating risk.”As recently as a few weeks before he left the planet, he expressed excitement over the over breakthroughs in his efforts to educate the policy makers in life safety that quality of life and managing risk needed to be compatible. His clarity, commitment and compassion were still strong. But I was worried that his voice was weakened and his stamina was short.In a philanthropic world that is too often bureaucratic, short on vision and self congratulatory, Rob Mayer’s approach to activist social venture philanthropy should be a case study for every young person of inherited wealth who wants to invest in leveraging profound social change.Related PostsChanges to Life Safety CodeThe Green House Project is excited to report that the Pioneer Network/Rothschild Regulatory Task Force’s life safety code revision recommendations submitted to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) have been approved and will be incorporated into the 2012 edition of … Continue reading →“For time and the world do not stand still. Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or the present are certain to miss the future.” — John F. KennedyThe Pioneer Network recently sent out these announcements: Pioneer Network is pleased to announce that all of the proposals that its National Life Safety Task Force: A Rothschild Regulatory Task Force submitted to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) have … Continue reading →Surplus Safety: A Symposium To Redefine RiskDrs. Judah Ronch, Dean of the Erickson School of Aging, and Dr. William Thomas, founder of the Eden Alternative and Green House Project, have coined a new term and developed a new concept called surplus safety. The first-ever Surplus Safety Symposium was held on September 12 – 13, 2012 in…TweetShare22ShareEmail22 SharesTags: Care Partnerlast_img read more

Glooko study sheds light on use of CGM data among diabetes healthcare

first_img Source:https://www.glooko.com/press-release/glooko-study-highlights-insights-diabetes-healthcare-professionals-use-continuous-glucose-monitoring-cgm-data/ Glooko provides a full range of features that enables healthcare professionals to quickly upload and visually analyze CGM data to help create, alter, and optimize patient care plans.The 27th Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress will be held May 16-20 in Boston. In addition to the poster presentation on May 18 from 5-6:30 pm, Glooko will be showcasing its products in booth 1607 on the exhibition floor. May 16 2018Glooko, the leader in diabetes data management, today announced the results of its recent study which examined diabetes healthcare professionals’ use of CGM data. The study asked 38 diabetes healthcare professionals (29 endocrinologists; nine diabetes educators) to assess CGM data from 10 people with type 1 diabetes within the Glooko platform. The diabetes healthcare professionals were asked to qualitatively rank each patient’s daily glycemic control from “best” to “worst” and indicate which CGM data features were relevant in the ranking process.Related StoriesMetformin use linked to lower risk of dementia in African Americans with type 2 diabetesUTHealth researchers investigate how to reduce stress-driven alcohol useDiabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have beneficial long-term clinical outcomes More than 70% of surveyed clinicians endorsed using three or more CGM data features in assessing glycemic control. This suggests that clinicians value CGM data features which have expanded utility compared to traditional glycemic indicators (SMBG readings, HbA1c) that are static and less dense. Hypoglycemia and variance were the most frequently endorsed CGM data features (89.7% and 82.8% of all participants, respectively). Hyperglycemia (44.8%), time-in- (37.9%) and out-of-range (34.5%), and mean daily glucose levels (24.1%) were also frequently endorsed. No differences were observed between endocrinologists and diabetes educators in how each group assessed CGM data.last_img read more

Mount Sinai study could help doctors to better understand and manage diseases

first_img Source:https://www.mountsinai.org/about/newsroom/2018/mount-sinai-researchers-use-sensory-mapping-to-define-sensitivity-variations-in-human-voice-box Jun 29 2018Study Could Lead to Better Diagnosis and Treatment of Diseases Affecting the LarynxIn a first-of-its-kind study, Mount Sinai researchers have used sensory mapping to discover that the posterior part of the larynx (closest to the swallowing tract) is the main area of the voice box to protect the airway from potentially dangerous swallowed or inhaled substances. This novel finding can potentially help doctors better understand and manage diseases affecting the larynx and lead to new, targeted treatments. The results of this study have been published in the June online edition of The Laryngoscope.”The human voice box (‘larynx’) is arguably one of the most life-sustaining organs in the body, yet there is still much we don’t know about its basic functions. This study sheds light on a critical protective function of the larynx that we have not had definite proof of until now,” explained author Catherine Sinclair, MD, FRACS, Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “Understanding this aspect of basic larynx physiology is essential to help us diagnose laryngeal disease, manage it appropriately, and create new therapies.”Dr. Sinclair, along with Sedat Ulkatan, MD, Director of Intraoperative Neurophysiology at Mount Sinai West, and Maria Tellez, MD, Neurophysiologist at Mount Sinai West, started this research to find out if different areas of the human larynx had different abilities to elicit a protective airway reflex termed the “laryngeal adductor reflex” (LAR), which is an involuntary protective response to stimuli in the larynx. This is important because many conditions affecting the larynx, including cancer, reflux, laryngomalacia (‘soft larynx’ in infancy), and laryngospasm (uncontrolled contraction of the larynx), likely impair or over activate our ability to elicit the LAR, which in turn can impair airway protection, putting patients at increased risk of aspiration and pneumonia.Related Stories’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’Researchers analyzed 10 patients while under general anesthesia. All had normal laryngeal function. The team used a probe to deliver a low-intensity electric stimulus to different areas of the larynx and recorded whenever this stimulus was able to elicit the LAR and cause vocal cord contraction. They discovered that stimulation of the back part of the larynx produced vocal cord contraction in all patients. No other areas of the larynx produced consistent results. This proved that the back of the larynx is a highly sensitive area and the one to most easily elicit the LAR. Before this study, it was widely known that if patients had the back part of their voice box removed or affected by certain diseases, they had a more difficult time protecting their airway. The research showed at a physiological level why that is the case. Researchers also found that the vocal folds themselves do not elicit a reflex to low-intensity stimulations.”This knowledge is essential to facilitate our accurate diagnosis and treatment of a variety of upper-airway diseases. These results will allow us to refine existing and develop new techniques for the diagnosis of diseases such as aspiration, dysphagia, and laryngospasm,” said Dr. Sinclair. “The study results may also give us insight into unexplainable diseases including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). We hope to use the results of this study to develop new diagnostic tests for laryngeal diseases.””This study will help to transform our current understanding of the protective function of the larynx, conceivably opening new exploration opportunities in various human respiratory disorders such as SIDS and patients with high risk of aspiration undergoing general anesthesia,” said Dr. Ulkatan. “We will be able to explore new diagnostic tests and possibly some therapeutic neuromodulation due to the new groundbreaking physiologic principles uncovered in this research,” added Dr. Tellez.​last_img read more

Study raises possibility of detecting childhood bone cancers earlier

first_img Source:https://www.sanger.ac.uk/news/view/children-s-bone-cancers-could-remain-hidden-years-diagnosis Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Aug 30 2018Scientists have discovered that some childhood bone cancers start growing years before they are currently diagnosed. Researchers at The Wellcome Sanger Institute and Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), Canada discovered large-scale genetic rearrangements in Ewing Sarcomas and other children’s cancers, and showed these can take years to form in bone or soft tissue. This study will help unravel the causes of childhood cancers and raises the possibility of finding ways to diagnose and treat these cancers earlier in the future.Reported in the journal Science today (31st August 2018), the research also showed that cancers with the complex genetic rearrangements were more aggressive and could benefit from more intense treatment than other cancers. This will help doctors decide on the best treatment for each patient.Ewing sarcoma is a rare cancer found mainly in bone or soft tissue of young teenagers as they grow, and is the second most commonly diagnosed bone cancer in children and young people. Treatment involves chemotherapy, surgery to remove the affected part of the bone if possible and radiotherapy. However, this harsh regime has hardly changed for the last 40 years and fails about one third of patients.Cancer is a genetic disease and in Ewing sarcoma, two specific genes, EWSR1 and ETS, are fused together. To understand the genetic events leading to this, researchers sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 124 tumors. They discovered that in nearly half of the cases, the main gene fusion occurred when the DNA completely rearranged itself, forming complex loops of DNA.Dr Adam Shlien, one of the lead authors on the paper, Associate Director of Translational Genetics and Scientist in Genetics & Genome Biology, and co-Director of the SickKids Cancer Sequencing (KiCS) program at SickKids, said: “Many childhood sarcomas are driven by gene fusions, however until now we have not known how or when these key events occur, or whether these processes change at relapse. We found dramatic early chromosomal shattering in 42 percent of Ewing sarcomas, not only fusing two critical genes together, but also disrupting a number of important areas.”Related StoriesWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenResearch reveals genetic cause of deadly digestive disease in childrenNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenThe earlier a cancer is diagnosed, the easier it is to treat, but until now it was thought that Ewing sarcoma was very fast growing. Surprisingly, the researchers found that the complex DNA rearrangements that cause Ewing sarcoma had occurred years before the tumor was diagnosed. This offers possibilities of finding ways to screen for these cancers to treat them earlier.Dr Sam Behjati one of the lead authors on the paper from Wellcome Sanger Institute and University of Cambridge Department of Pediatrics, said: “In principle this study provides evidence that Ewing sarcoma could be detectable earlier, possibly even before it reveals itself as disease. If we could detect these childhood cancers sooner, when tumors are smaller, they would be much easier to treat. Further research is needed, but this possibility of finding a way to diagnose Ewing sarcomas earlier could help patients in the future.”The researchers discovered that Ewing Sarcomas with these complex genetic rearrangements were more aggressive than those with simple gene-fusions, and that any relapses needed different treatments. Understanding this could help clinicians offer the best treatment options for each patient.Dr. David Malkin, co-lead author, Staff Oncologist, Scientist and co-Director of the SickKids Cancer Sequencing (KiCS) program, said: “As an increasing and diverse number of tumor genome sequences become available, we may be able to define further rearrangement processes that underlie fusion genes and thus unravel the causes of fusion-driven human cancers. Our goal is to better understand these cancers in an attempt to improve treatment and outcomes.”last_img read more

Mayo Clinic physicians win SU2C Catalyst Award to fund melanoma research

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 7 2018Mayo Clinic physicians Matthew Block, M.D., Ph.D. and Tina Hieken, M.D., have received a Stand up to Cancer (SU2C) Catalyst Award to fund melanoma research and a neoadjuvant clinical trial.”This study, “Neoactivate”, will test two novel approaches to the treatment of patients with high-risk, stage 3 melanoma guided by specific mutations within the melanoma,” says Dr. Hieken. “Two combinations of immunotherapy and targeted therapy will be given before surgery, and all patients will receive immunotherapy after surgery.””Our study will look at how effective these drug therapies are when given prior to and after surgery in treating patients with high-risk, stage 3 melanoma,” says Dr. Block. “We also will evaluate key biomarkers of treatment response and patient outcomes.”Related StoriesCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerPatients participating in the clinical trial will receive the combination of cobimetinib and atezolizumab, or the combination of vemurafenib, cobimetinib and atezolizumab followed by surgery and adjuvant treatment with atezolizumab. All three medicines are manufactured by Genentech, a member of the Roche Group.Drs. Block and Hieken say they hope to learn if the combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy before surgery, and immunotherapy after surgery works better than standard adjuvant therapy for treating patients with high-risk, stage 3 melanoma. They also plan to identify biomarkers that may predict treatment response.”We are so pleased that Dr. Block and Dr. Hieken are bringing this important clinical trial to our SU2C Catalyst portfolio,” says Sung Poblete, Ph.D., president and CEO, Stand up to Cancer. “This team adds depth and breadth to our already robust collaboration with the Mayo Clinic, helping to advance the standard of care for cancer patients.””SU2C Catalyst has created a structured and prioritized approach to translational clinical studies, bringing together the key players, such as Drs. Block and Hieken, with oversight from Stand up to Cancer’s renowned academic advisors and representatives of Genentech, in order to accelerate the time to get new treatments to patients,” says Raymond DuBois, M.D., Ph.D., dean of the College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, and chair of the Stand up to Cancer Catalyst ─ Genentech Subcommittee.As SU2C’s scientific partner, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and a Scientific Advisory Committee led by Nobel Laureate Phillip Sharp, Ph.D, conduct rigorous, competitive review processes to identify the best research proposals to recommend for funding, oversee grants administration and provide expert review of research progress.​ Source:https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-physicians-receive-stand-up-to-cancer-catalyst-award-for-melanoma-research/last_img read more

ScienceShot Why Pigeons Dont Crash

We know a lot about how birds navigate over long distances, yet little about how they steer through small-scale, cluttered environments like forests and city streets. How, for example, do they decide on a course that won’t lead to a nasty crash? To address this question, researchers constructed randomized obstacle courses of vertical poles, through which four pigeons—trained to fly between two perches—could traverse. A series of ceiling-mounted, high-speed cameras were used to monitor the animals, which wore pairs of LED markers—on the head (pictured) and on the body—so they could be tracked. From these, the scientists constructed 3D maps of the birds’ flight paths. Pigeons seem to use a reactive approach to navigating obstacles, the researchers report online today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, with the birds first adjusting their flight path when only 1.5 meters from the entry to the artificial forest—rather than planning out their path in advance. By combining data on each run of the course with the respective layout of obstacles, the team was then able to reconstruct a literal bird’s-eye view along the flight, breaking down the journey into sections to determine, at each point, how the pigeons might decide on a path to take based on the obstacles they encounter. Rather than solely attempting to minimize the extent of their course corrections (by aiming for the nearest gaps between obstacles lying in their path), pigeons seem to prefer steering toward larger gaps, if available, when making rapid steering decisions: a behavior that the researchers call “a surprisingly simple strategy for such sophisticated behavior,” and one that might inform the development of controllers for guiding flying robots in the future.See more ScienceShots. read more

NASAs planet hunter safe again for now

first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe NASA has regained control of its exoplanet discovery satellite Kepler following a fraught few days during which the spacecraft had put itself into a protective “emergency mode.” What went wrong is not yet clear, but on Sunday morning controllers had the spacecraft in a stable state with its communications antenna pointing toward Earth. Data from the spacecraft are being downloaded and analyzed to find out the cause of the problem.Kepler had finished its last observing campaign on 23 March and was in a “rest” state waiting for the next one, which was due to begin last week. The emergency mode began some 14 hours before the observations were due to begin. This is the first time Kepler has had to resort to emergency mode in its 7 years in space. Investigations into the event will continue throughout this week, NASA says. NASA launched Kepler in 2009 to search out roughly Earth-sized planets around sunlike stars. It does this by staring at a few select parts of the sky and monitoring the brightness of 150,000 target stars over long periods. If any of those stars dimmed slightly for a while and then brightened again that could be a sign that an orbiting planet has passed in front of it. This “transit method” proved hugely successful: In more than 4 years of operation it detected 4696 candidate exoplanets, of which 1041 have been confirmed by other detection methods or statistical techniques.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Already beyond its designed mission, NASA had planned to operate Kepler for another few years, but that was put in doubt in 2012 when one of its four reaction wheels—devices necessary for pointing the spacecraft accurately—failed. Kepler could keep working with three reaction wheels but when a second failed in May 2013 the mission seemed all but lost. However, mission engineers worked out a way to steer the spacecraft—not as well as before, but good enough—using a combination of its thrusters, the surviving reaction wheels, and the pressure of sunlight on its solar panels. Dubbed K2, the new mission was opened to suggestions from astronomers and since June 2014 has been counting certain exoplanet-star combinations, studying stellar structure and activity, looking for the progenitors of supernovae, and discovering binary stars, among other things.Mission controllers discovered that Kepler was in trouble again last week. During a recent check in with the spacecraft on 7 April they found that it had put itself into emergency mode, its lowest-activity operational state. It had gone into emergency mode 36 hours earlier, just before Kepler was about to begin a campaign to detect exoplanets by gravitational microlensing. Prior to that, the spacecraft had been in good health. To complicate matters, Kepler is 120 million kilometers from Earth, so messages take 13 minutes to travel to the spacecraft and back. “It was the quick response and determination of the engineers throughout the weekend that led to the recovery,” Kepler mission manager Charlie Sobeck said in a statement.Earth-based observatories that are collaborating with Kepler in the microlensing campaign will continue observing this week while the spacecraft has its health check. The required observing window onto the center of the Milky Way remains open until 1 July.It is “a huge relief that the K2 mission will continue,” says astronomer Sara Seager of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. “Already K2 has yielded 2 dozen exoplanets with more than 250 awaiting confirmation.”last_img read more

Indias premier research lab network gets cold shoulder in new budget

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Sanjay KumarFeb. 2, 2018 , 3:25 PM The Central Building Research Institute in Roorkee, India, and other top labs are in for more belt-tightening. NEW DELHI—When the Indian government rolled out its national budget for 2018–19 here yesterday, many researchers could breathe a sigh of relief: Most science agencies got modest but inflation-beating increases. Not the 4600 scientists at the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) here. The national network of 38 premier scientific laboratories is slated to receive $711.7 million, a 3.3% increase—only about half this year’s forecasted inflation rate.In 2015, the government sought to wean CSIR off the federal coffer, directing it to raise up to half its budget by commercializing its technologies. The council has made headway toward that target, and now funds about a quarter of its budget from outside sources. The cash-strapped labs took another hit last year, when new rules on salaries, pensions, and perks for government employees forced the council to raid its research budget for the increased personnel costs.“Sometimes a little tightening of the belt is good for the system,” CSIR’s Director General Girish Sahni told Science. As a result, he says, CSIR labs “have become focused.”  Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Sanyam Bahga/Wikimedia Commons Email India’s premier research lab network gets cold shoulder in new budget But the budget news has left rank-and-file CSIR scientists crestfallen. “The miniscule increase would ensure that a resource crunch remains a perennial headache,” says one CSIR scientist who requested anonymity. Most of the council’s budget is now funnelled to salaries and pension payments, and on keeping the lights on at the institutes. “We can’t give money for our research programs,” the scientist says.CSIR fared worse than other science agencies. Overall, India’s civilian R&D spending is set to rise 10.8%, to $8.1 billion. Big winners include India’s space program, which will get a 17.8% boost, and renewable energy with a hefty 26.1% increase. The Department of Science & Technology and the Department of Biotechnology, which together fund the lion’s share of India’s basic research, will increase 8.8% and 6.7%, respectively—relatively flat budgets taking inflation into account.The government could have rewarded CSIR for the efforts it made over the past couple years to generate revenue, says Dinesh Abrol, a science policy expert at the Institute for Studies in Industrial Development here and a former chief scientist at CSIR. However, he says, “The budget does not provide any incentive or cushion” for the council, which now must scramble to fund any research at its labs.Sahni insists CSIR’s plight is not grave. “There has been no real impact on research due to resource crunch,” he contends. New research projects in the pipeline will be funded, he says. “We are confident that we will generate additional funds from licensing our technologies and other value added technical services.”last_img read more

Sea otter archaeology reveals the most smashing rocks

first_imgOver 10 years of observations, the team identified a so-called “otter signature.” Rocks used as tools had points and ridges that were lighter in color than the rest of the rock. Next, the researchers examined 421 additional rocks in the area and found that 77 were being used to break open shellfish, they report today in Scientific Reports. Shattered mussel shells littering the rocks nearby corroborated the findings, showing telltale breakages that matched the otters’ blunt force modus operandi.With their distinctive patterns, the stones could tell scientists when sea otters started to use tools. The researchers say understanding how long this behavior has been around and how it spread through populations could also help illuminate the broader question of how tool use in other mammals—including humans—evolved. Sea otters—the only marine mammals known to use stone tools—eat on the go by cracking open mussels, sea urchins, and abalone with rocks, using their furry chests as anvils. Now, a new study shows that, by borrowing techniques from archaeology, marine biologists can pick out otter “utensils” from other rocks.Many primates have also been shown to use stone tools. Recently, researchers have blended biology and archaeology to identify patterns of wear on such tools used by apes and monkeys—dating some as far back as 700 years. The findings made researchers wonder whether such methods could also be used on sea otters.Many sea otter rocks get discarded to the sea floor, but some turn up on beaches, where the otters bang their shelled prey against boulders protruding from the sea. One such place, an estuary in central California called Bennett Slough, offered researchers an opportunity to examine the otters’ feeding behavior—and the rocks they dropped after smashing up dinner. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email By Alex FoxMar. 14, 2019 , 10:00 AMcenter_img Sea otter archaeology reveals the most smashing rocks Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more